The Song of Ceber

Argument: Takara, the Clockwork Goddess, realizing that while her husband the Red Dragon God, is awake, she won't be able to harm Ceber. Going to her niece's garden, the Clockwork Goddess hopes to obtain a sedative to put her husband to sleep.

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In the garden

Takara, thinking long,
To herself saying,
“The Giant Time has said to me beware thy
husband’s adopted daughter she shall slay you if she
can. Prophecy’s proof is in the happening. But I
can bend this back and foul up fate in its own works.”

Clever counting       geared goddess
went to the golden garden.
She knew Terite,       husband, brother,
Would not let her kill one of his own.
She desired       a distraction
for Terite       dragon-heart
So she could       con fate’s cogs

Ausohara       tulip-tamer
Sweet maiden       of the morning
In among the lilacs
Greeted her aunt and said:

“My father’s sister, so rare a sight
in my garden.
I did not expect you here.”

Takara       tamer of truth
Though evil and spoke,
to her niece       of nestled nettles:
“I come in supplication. My husband, Terite, is insistent.
I have no desire while resting but he is restless: A beast with a sting!
Do you have in your garden
A sedative       to sedate
to slumber       to slip him
off to sleep’s       slow kingdom?”

Simple Ausohara
never she expecting mischief
consented       to the con
Presented Takara with
Everbloom       the blue blossom
that stills the senses
The very same that Vertè
used on Clifdora
Bewitching her mind’s eye
When he sought her riches
And the crown       of Comely
But he too fell to the blossom
Having five score as Vertè’s fatal dose.
His line ended,
His children murdered.

When that night       the nocturnal nectar
passed the dragon’s lips
No sensation       but cession
Entered his thoughts.
No virile moods
No rabbitty urges.
Nothing but blue blossom’s       promise of peace.


The Song of Ceber

Song of Ceber 0: Explanatory Notes ¦ 1 ¦ 2 ¦ 3 ¦ 4 ¦ 5 ¦ 6 ¦ 7 ¦ 8 ¦ 9 ¦ 10 ¦ 11 ¦ 12 ¦ 13 ¦ 14 ¦ 15 ¦ 16 ¦ 17 ¦ 18 ¦ 19 ¦ 20 ¦ 21 ¦ 22 ¦ 23 ¦ 24 ¦ 25 ¦ 26 ¦ 27 ¦ 28 ¦ 29 ¦ 30 ¦ 31 ¦ 32 ¦ 33 ¦ 34 ¦ 35 ¦ 36

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