aka Winkum

Wink is a game played by young Quakers (also known as Young Friends) and other members of Religious Youth Organizations. The game is surprisingly violent for a non-violent organization.
The game has many variations. The following is one:

Pairs of Players arrange themselves into a circle. A good game of wink has at least eight pairs -- much less and one must resort to playing Line Wink. Each pair is made up of one person sitting immediately behind another person. One person sitting in the circle does not have a partner at the start of the game. This person is the Winker.
When this arrangement is reached, the game commenced. The game is played out in a series of rounds. A single round plays out like this:

The Winker selects several pairs of players, usually around three.

When selected, the player sitting on the inside of the pair, that is, in front of the other player, must try to kiss the winker. This would seem an easy task, as the object of the winker is to be kissed. However, the object of the person sitting behind our courageous player is to stop them from reaching the winker.

Now, as the game is fairly physical, there some rules that are customarily followed to reduce injury.

No jewelry of any kind. This includes necklaces, watches, rings, piercings etc. It is VERY easy to get this caught and injure yourself.

While waiting to be winked, both cheeks of both players must be touching the ground and the players may not be touching each other.

Neither player, while the pair is in play, must be kneeling or lower -- i.e. feet may not be stood upon. No crouching, walking, running. While this increases exponetially the probability of contracting wink burn it also prevents you from cracking your skull open.

When a person says stop all play ends. In this respect, it is like fight club.

An entry for The Blood is the Life: A Frightful Halloween Quest.

BANG.

The banging at the door isn't real. It's in my head. I bolted the door but then I always do that at night. There's not really anyone banging on the door.

BANG.

It's just a holdover from the drugs, it's bound to be. Stuff that strong is going to mess me up for a while, make me hear things that aren't there.

BANG.

I'm lucky I'm only hearing things. I'm lucky I know when to stop. Danny and the others didn't make it.

BANG.

Stupid Danny, always has a story. It's never enough that you should do what he wants, follow his crazy schemes, he wants you to believe him, believe in his fantasies that turn irresponsible antics into adventures.

BANG.

This time the story was 'immortality' of all things. We're sitting around dazed after an evening of substance abuse and he suddenly produces these 'magic tablets'. "These aren't just any pills," he insists, wild-eyed and intense as ever. "This isn't just the latest buzz, the latest high. These are the real thing baby. Guy I got them off says you take these, you live forever man! We can party 'til the sun burns out, I'm telling you! All of us, together, forever!"

BANG.

So now he's handing out these pills, and I let him give one to me because I know what he's like but I'm already plenty out of my head and I know it so I don't swallow it, I don't swallow it. Good job too, because half an hour later I'm the only one still breathing.

BANG.

I call for an ambulance of course but it's too late, it's too late. The ambulance guys - blank-faced, bored, seen so much death that they don't really see it any more - they don't even try to resuscitate Danny and the others. They just get out the body bags and start zipping them up.

BANG.

I'm still pretty out of it at this point, of course, and I'm watching them zip up the bags, watching them zip up my friends, and I'm looking at Danny's face, cold, dead, as they zip up the bag, and just as it closes, just as it closes, I could swear I saw him wink at me.

BANG.

He can't have done, of course. The ambulance guy certified him dead. I was just seeing things. The drugs. Just like the banging at the door. It's not real. It's not real.

BANG. BANG. BANG.

wink

To tip one the wink ; to give a signal by winking the eye.

The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Wink (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Winked (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Winking.] [OE. winken, AS. wincian; akin to D. wenken, G. winken to wink, nod, beckon, OHG. winchan, Sw. vinka, Dan. vinke, AS. wancol wavering, OHG. wanchal wavering, wanchn to waver, G. wanken, and perhaps to E. weak; cf. AS. wincel a corner. Cf. Wench, Wince, v. i.]

1.

To nod; to sleep; to nap.

[Obs.] "Although I wake or wink."

Chaucer.

2.

To shut the eyes quickly; to close the eyelids with a quick motion.

He must wink, so loud he would cry. Chaucer.

And I will wink, so shall the day seem night. Shak.

They are not blind, but they wink. Tillotson.

3.

To close and open the eyelids quickly; to nictitate; to blink.

A baby of some three months old, who winked, and turned aside its little face from the too vivid light of day. Hawthorne.

4.

To give a hint by a motion of the eyelids, often those of one eye only.

Wink at the footman to leave him without a plate. Swift.

5.

To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.

The times of this ignorance God winked at. Acts xvii. 30.

And yet, as though he knew it not, His knowledge winks, and lets his humors reign. Herbert.

Obstinacy can not be winked at, but must be subdued. Locke.

6.

To be dim and flicker; as, the light winks.

Winking monkey Zool., the white-nosed monkey (Cersopithecus nictitans).

 

© Webster 1913.


Wink, v. t.

To cause (the eyes) to wink.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Wink, n.

1.

The act of closing, or closing and opening, the eyelids quickly; hence, the time necessary for such an act; a moment.

I have not slept one wink. Shak.

I could eclipse and cloud them with a wink. Donne.

2.

A hint given by shutting the eye with a significant cast.

Sir. P. Sidney.

The stockjobber thus from Change Alley goes down, And tips you, the freeman, a wink. Swift.

 

© Webster 1913.

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