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42:1 As the hart panteth after the water brooks, so panteth my soul after thee, O God.
42:2 My soul thirsteth for God, for the living God: when shall I come and appear before God?
42:3 My tears have been my meat day and night, while they continually say unto me, Where is thy God?
42:4 When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.
42:5 Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted in me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him for the help of his countenance.
42:6 O my God, my soul is cast down within me: therefore will I remember thee from the land of Jordan, and of the Hermonites, from the hill Mizar.
42:7 Deep calleth unto deep at the noise of thy waterspouts: all thy waves and thy billows are gone over me.
42:8 Yet the LORD will command his lovingkindness in the day time, and in the night his song shall be with me, and my prayer unto the God of my life.
42:9 I will say unto God my rock, Why hast thou forgotten me? why go I mourning because of the oppression of the enemy?
42:10 As with a sword in my bones, mine enemies reproach me; while they say daily unto me, Where is thy God?
42:11 Why art thou cast down, O my soul? and why art thou disquieted within me? hope thou in God: for I shall yet praise him, who is the health of my countenance, and my God.



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From the Great Bible, 1540 edition (known as Cranmer's Bible). Set in the Book of Common Prayer, 1662, for Evening Prayer on the eighth day of the month.

PSALM 42. Quemadmodum.

  1. Like as the hart desireth the water-brooks : so longeth my soul after thee, O God.
  2. My soul is athirst for God, yea, even for the living God : when shall I come to appear before the presence of God?
  3. My tears have been my meat day and night : while they daily say unto me, Where is now thy God?
  4. Now when I think thereupon, I pour out my heart by myself : for I went with the multitude, and brought them forth into the house of God;
  5. In the voice of praise and thanksgiving, : among such as keep holy-day.
  6. Why art thou so full of heaviness, O my soul : and why art thou so disquieted within me?
  7. O put thy trust in God : for I will yet thank him, which is the help of my countenance, and my God.
  8. My soul is vexed within me : therefore will I remember thee from the land of Jordan, from Hermon and the little hill.
  9. One deep calleth another, because of the noise of thy water-pipes : all thy waves and storms are gone over me.
  10. The LORD will grant his loving-kindness in the daytime : and in the night season will I sing of him, and make my prayer unto the God of my life.
  11. I will say unto the God of my strength, Why hast thou forgotten me : why go I thus heavily, while the enemy oppresseth me?
  12. My bones are smitten asunder as with a sword : while mine enemies that trouble me cast me in the teeth;
  13. Namely, while they say daily unto me : Where is now thy God?
  14. Why art thou so vexed, O my soul : and why art thou so disquieted within me?
  15. O put thy trust in God : for I will yet thank him, which is the help of my countenance, and my God.



From the Vulgate, where it is listed, according to the Catholic manner, as Psalm 41:

  1. Sicut areola praeparata ad inrigationes aquarum sic anima mea praeparata est ad te Deus.
  2. Sitivit anima mea Deum fortem viventem quando veniam et parebo ante faciem tuam.
  3. Fuerunt mihi lacrimae meae panis per diem ac noctem cum diceretur mihi tota die ubi est Deus tuus.
  4. Horum recordatus sum et effudi in me animam meam quia veniam ad umbraculum tacebo usque ad domum Dei in voce laudis et confessionis multitudinis festa celebrantis.
  5. Quare incurvaris anima mea et conturbas me expecta Dominum quia adhuc confitebor ei salutaribus vultus eius.
  6. Deus meus in memet ipso anima mea incurvatur propterea recordabor tui de terra Iordanis et Hermoniim de monte minimo.
  7. Abyssus abyssum vocat in voce cataractarum tuarum omnes gurgites tui et fluctus tui super me transierunt.
  8. Per diem mandavit Dominus misericordiam suam et in nocte canticum eius mecum oratio Deo vitae meae.
  9. Dicam Deo petra mea quare oblitus es mei quare tristis incedo adfligente inimico Cum me interficerent in ossibus meis exprobraverunt mihi hostes mei dicentes tota die ubi est Deus tuus.
  10. Quare incurvaris anima mea et conturbas me expecta Dominum quoniam adhuc confitebor ei salutibus vultus mei et Deo meo.



The psalm in either case may be followed by the Gloria Patri.

This hymn provides the source of the hymn As Pants the Hart for Cooling Streams. The 1540 translation is somewhat infamous for its use of the expression 'water-pipes' in verse 9. Later translations tend to say 'cataracts' instead.
Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible
back to: Psalms
Book: Psalms
Chapter: 42

Overview:
The conflict in the soul of a believer.

1-5 The psalmist looked to the Lord as his chief good, and set
his Heart upon him accordingly; casting Anchor thus at first, he
rides out the storm. A gracious soul can take little
satisfaction in God's courts, if it do not meet with God himself
there. Living souls never can take up their Rest any where short
of a living God. To appear before the Lord is the desire of the
upright, as it is the dread of the Hypocrite. Nothing is more
grievous to a gracious soul, than what is intended to shake its
confidence in the Lord. It was not the remembrance of the
pleasures of his Court that afflicted David; but the remembrance
of the free access he formerly had to God's House, and his
pleasure in attending there. Those that commune much with their
own hearts, will often have to chide them. See the cure of
sorrow. When the soul rests On itself, it sinks; if it catches
Hold On the power and promise of God, the head is kept above the
billows. And what is our support under present woes but this,
that we shall have comfort in Him. We have great cause to Mourn
for Sin; but being cast down springs from unbelief and a
rebellious will; we should therefore strive and pray against it.

6-11 The way to forget our miseries, is to remember the God of
our mercies. David saw troubles coming from God's wrath, and
that discouraged him. But if one trouble follow hard after
another, if all seem to combine for our ruin, let us remember
they are all appointed and overruled By the Lord. David regards
the Divine favour as the Fountain of all the good he looked for.
In the Saviour's name let us Hope and pray. One Word from him
will calm every storm, and turn midnight Darkness into the Light
of noon, the bitterest complaints into joyful praises. Our
believing expectation of Mercy must quicken our prayers for it.
At length, is Faith came off conqueror, By encouraging him to
trust in the name of the Lord, and to stay himself upon his God.
He adds, And my God; this thought enabled him to triumph over
all his griefs and fears. Let us never think that the God of our
Life, and the Rock of our Salvation, has forgotten us, if we
have made his Mercy, Truth, and power, our Refuge. Thus the
psalmist strove against his despondency: at last his Faith and
Hope obtained the victory. Let us learn to check all unbelieving
doubts and fears. Apply the promise first to ourselves, and then
plead it to God.

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