Whiff (?), n. [OE. weffe vapor, whiff, probably of imitative origin; cf. Dan. vift a puff, gust, W. chwiff a whiff, puff.]

1.

A sudden expulsion of air from the mouth; a quick puff or slight gust, as of air or smoke.

But with the whiff and wind of his fell sword The unnerved father falls. Shak.

The skipper, he blew a whiff from his pipe, And a scornful laugh laughed he. Longfellow.

2.

A glimpse; a hasty view.

[Prov. Eng.]

3. Zool.

The marysole, or sail fluke.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whiff, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Whiffed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Whiffing.]

1.

To throw out in whiffs; to consume in whiffs; to puff.

2.

To carry or convey by a whiff, or as by a whiff; to puff or blow away.

Old Empedocles, . . . who, when he leaped into Etna, having a dry, sear body, and light, the smoke took him, and whiffed him up into the moon. B. Jonson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whiff, v. i.

To emit whiffs, as of smoke; to puff.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.