3. (adj.) modifying word used to describe a negative situation.
example: "That white brother is banging Tisha."
"Thats whack.

wetware = W = whack-a-mole

whack v.

According to arch-hacker James Gosling (designer of NeWS, GOSMACS and Java), to "...modify a program with no idea whatsoever how it works." (See whacker.) It is actually possible to do this in nontrivial circumstances if the change is small and well-defined and you are very good at glarking things from context. As a trivial example, it is relatively easy to change all stderr writes to stdout writes in a piece of C filter code which remains otherwise mysterious.

--The Jargon File version 4.3.1, ed. ESR, autonoded by rescdsk.

Since the advent of 802.11b wireless LAN, "whack" has increasingly been used to mean "wireless hack", referring to the ability of a hacker to gain unauthorized access to an unsecured wireless access point of an unsuspecting business or residence. Such access most commonly occurs during, or as a result of, wardriving to sniff out open access points.

Whack (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Whacked (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Whacking.] [Cf. Thwack.]

To strike; to beat; to give a heavy or resounding blow to; to thrash; to make with whacks.

[Colloq.]

Rodsmen were whacking their way through willow brakes. G. W. Cable.

 

© Webster 1913.


Whack, v. i.

To strike anything with a smart blow.

To whack away, to continue striking heavy blows; as, to whack away at a log. [Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Whack, n.

A smart resounding blow.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Whack (?), v. t.

To divide into shares; as, to whack the spoils of a robbery; -- often with up. [Slang]

 

© Webster 1913


Whack, n.

A portion; share; allowance. [Slang] --
Out of whack, out of order. [Slang]

 

© Webster 1913

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