To conform means to fit into something, to mold into the shape of another vessel or into a shape that another entity wants you to be in. Conforming is modifying something to be something else, something that it may not actually be.

In the United States great value is placed in being able to conform, despite our ostensible love of freedom and individuality. Those are fine, as long as you fit within the container of mainstream society. There really isn't a real desire by the bulk of society to see people who refuse to fit within it.

We all conform to be part of groups of people. Especially groups of people we like, for whatever reason. We usually aren't completely like other people, so we conform our external appearance and actions to mesh better with them. Sometimes, we actually change and become more like them; other times, we remain superficial.

Even if you fight conformity you're conforming with those who choose to fight conformity (please see bad paraphasing of Rush lyrics for a better explanation.)

Con*form" (?), a. [L. conformis; con- + forma form: cf. F. conforme.]

Of the same form; similar in import; conformable.
Bacon.

Care must be taken that the interpretation be every way conform to the analogy of faith.
Bp.Hall.

 

© Webster 1913.


Con*form", v. t. [ imp. & p. p. Conformed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Conforming.] [F. conformer, L. conformare, -formatum; con- + formare to form, forma form. See Form.]

To shape in accordance with; to make like; to bring into harmony or agreement with; -- usually with to or unto.

Demand of them wherefore they conform not themselves unto the order of the church.
Hooker.

 

© Webster 1913.


Con*form", v. i.

1.

To be in accord or harmony; to comply; to be obedient; to submit; -- with to or with.

A rule to which experience must conform.
Whewell.

2.

(Eng. Eccl. Hist.)

To comply with the usages of the Established Church; to be a conformist.

About two thousand ministers whose consciences did not suffer them to conform were driven from their benefices in a day.
Macaulay.

 

© Webster 1913.

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