Jug"gle (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Juggled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Juggling (?).] [OE. juglen; cf. OF. jogler, jugler, F. jongler. See Juggler.]

1.

To play tricks by sleight of hand; to cause amusement and sport by tricks of skill; to conjure.

2.

To practice artifice or imposture.

Be these juggling fiends no more believed. Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Jug"gle, v. t.

To deceive by trick or artifice.

Is't possible the spells of France should juggle Men into such strange mysteries? Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Jug"gle, n.

1.

A trick by sleight of hand.

2.

An imposture; a deception.

Tennyson.

A juggle of state to cozen the people. Tillotson.

3.

A block of timber cut to a length, either in the round or split.

Knight.

 

© Webster 1913.

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