A cemetery in Genoa, noted for its fine sculpture and neo-classical galleries. It was first planned by Carlo Barabino in 1835, but he dying shortly afterwards (memo to self: never think "hm, I'll plan a cemetery", it's just asking for trouble), and completed by his student G. Resasco. It has been expanded since then and continues to be used.

The most famous image from it is the poignant mourning scene by O. Toso, chosen by Ian Curtis for the cover of Joy Division's album Closer. Joy Division also used an angel by D. Paernio for their single "Love Will Tear Us Apart".

For pictures see

I would highly recommend especially the second of these sites if you like funerary art. I was led here by Apatrix correcting me on the source of the Closer cover. It's as if Michelangelo, Canova, and Eric Gill had been let loose in Highgate Cemetery.

Borgnino (on the first website) says "Staglieno is a strange mix of various styles. The neo-classic style is represented by old monuments that tell the destiny of aristocratic Genova families. But this style was surpassed by a fotographic realistic kind of monuments that make link accross death and life.

"In the same years you can find examples of got[h]ic - romantic style in the cemetery and a very interesting liberty wave to create beatiful tombs in the gallery. Santo Varni, G.Moreno, G.Navone, G.Monteverde are only few of the artists that worked in Staglieno."

Part of Barabino's original design was a Tempio dei Suffragi (temple of prayers offered up) at the entrance, a copy of the Pantheon; in front of this is a statue of Religion made by Santo Vanni in 1866.

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