Collection of securities held by mutual funds, other financial institutions or individuals;
as, a portfolio of blue-chip stocks.
Italian portafoglio (carrying case for papers).
The term for a collection of works by an individual or group. It is often used in reference to a group of collective work regardless of whether or not the works reside in one case.

Applicants for certain jobs and academic programs may be asked to supply a portfolio of their work so that their prospective employer or educational institution may see examples of their work and experience.

Common professions that make use of portfolios include writers, journalists, artists and musicians.

How to make a photography portfolio

So, you are a photographer, and you want to make a portfolio. I have had to do this a few times, and I have fucked up a few times, so I learned all of this the harshest way possible. Ah well - on with the show:

Image selection

Galleries

If you want to show your pictures in a gallery, you will need to make a selection of images around a theme of some sort. If you just run around and snap pictures, you will have to scrutinize them, to find out what they really are about. If there is no connection whatsoever between them, you might want to consider not making a portfolio, and rather concentrate on taking more pictures.

Why is a theme important? Well, although single pictures can be interesting, galleries tend to be interested in offering its visitors with a journey. Pick an emotion, and explore it visually, or perhaps a situation or a place. As long as there is some kind of "red thread" tying your images into a whole, you'll be all right.

Make sure that the images are in a logical order - either cronological, or through mood development. Be prepared that you will probably have to talk the person you are presenting your portfolio to through all the pictures, so if you have some kind of story prepared, all the better.

If you decide to mix colour prints and black and white prints, you'd better have a very good explanation as to why.

A good selection of images is 10-20. If you have several themes, make different portfolios, and present them separately.

Image libraries

This type of portfolio is the photographic equivalent of a "Best Of..." album.

Image libraries are the other extreme - here, it is okay to have a large batch of single, non-interconnected images, as this is not what the target audience is looking for. What they are looking for, however, is genericicity and perfection. The more generic the image is, the bigger the chance somebody will use it, as it is adaptable for many different situations.

If your image has a flaw, ditch it. If your image is only slightly out of focus, ditch it. If your image has brand names or visible logos in it, chances are it is worthless in connection with image libraries. If you do not have model releases for the people in your images, get rid of the pictures.

In short: Make sure you only show your very best images. It is better to pitch 3 perfect pictures than 15 good ones, but that don't stand out from the mass. You should aim for 7-15 great pictures, however.

Commercial photography

If you are making a commercial portfolio, be prepared to make it focussed. You might need to change your portfolio around depending on who you are pitching it to. If you are pitching fashion work, make sure you have 5-6 pictures from each series you have done, to show that you can consistently take good pictures. If you are doing product photography, make sure that you do the same: Same product from various angles etc.

If you try to pitch your general skills as a photographer, make sure that you make several portfolios. One for portraiture, one for nature, one for product photography, etc. That way, the person reviewing your portfolio can mentally prepare for something else. Also, it allows you to show only the portfolios that are relevant for the job you are doing.

If you have gotten pictures in print (especially viable if you are planning to do freelance news photography), include both prints and newspaper clippings - side by side on adjecent pages is good.

Portfolio Presentation

This is what people ask about most: How do you present your portfolio?

First of all, make sure that your prints are of the best quality possible. This means that they should be of a decent size (approximate A4 / letter size is an ideal tradeoff between presentability and portability)

As for the actual presentation of the portfolio, the answer is difficult to offer. Although a nice leather folder with high-quality plastic inlays to keep your images in offers a good initial impact, it may not be ideal, as the plastic may introduce sheen and / or reflections on the images, making them difficult to see.

In the past, I have seen portfolios that are presented as pictures mounted on cardboard, even loose pictures in a rolodex-style folder. You could consider getting a mini- easel that you can place the images on individually. That allows you and the reviewer to take a few steps away from the images - an especially good bonus if that is how the images are meant to be seen.

Creativity is a big bonus - if you manage to come up with a good way to present your portfolio effectively, it probably means you are doing the right thing. Don't fall for the temptation to show your images on a computer screen or data projector, however, unless this is how they are meant to be presented. If you only have slides, there is no way around showing it on a slide projector, but if there is any way you won't have to bring and / or arrange a projector, it is better.

Oh, and it is all in the attitude. Go in there, be sure of yourself, talk, talk, talk, and don't for a second let up that you had even slightly considered the possibility of them not liking your images. You'd be amazed what difference it makes.

Good luck!

-30-

Port*fol"io (?), n. [F. portefeuille; porter to carry + feuille a leaf. See Port to carry, and Folio.]

1.

A portable case for holding loose papers, prints, drawings, etc.

2.

Hence: The office and functions of a minister of state or member of the cabinet; as, to receive the portfolio of war; to resign the portfolio.

 

© Webster 1913.

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