Twine (?), n. [AS. twin, properly, a twisted or double thread; akin to D. twijn, Icel. twinni; from twi-. See Twice, and cf. Twin.]

1.

A twist; a convolution.

Typhon huge, ending in snaky twine. Milton.

2.

A strong thread composed of two or three smaller threads or strands twisted together, and used for various purposes, as for binding small parcels, making nets, and the like; a small cord or string.

3.

The act of twining or winding round.

J. Philips.

Twine reeler, a kind of machine for twisting twine; a kind of mule, or spinning machine.

 

© Webster 1913.


Twine, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Twined (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Twining.] [OE. twinen, fr. AS. tw&imac;n a twisted thread; akin to D. twijnen to twine, Icel. & Sw. tvinna, Dan. tvinde. See Twine, n.]

1.

To twist together; to form by twisting or winding of threads; to wreathe; as, fine twined linen.

2.

To wind, as one thread around another, or as any flexible substance around another body.

Let me twine Mine arms about that body. Shak.

3.

To wind about; to embrace; to entwine.

Let wreaths of triumph now my temples twine. Pope.

4.

To change the direction of.

[Obs.]

Fairfax.

5.

To mingle; to mix.

[Obs.]

Crashaw.

 

© Webster 1913.


Twine, v. i.

1.

To mutually twist together; to become mutually involved.

2.

To wind; to bend; to make turns; to meander.

As rivers, though they bend and twine, Still to the sea their course incline. Swift.

3.

To turn round; to revolve.

[Obs.]

Chapman.

4.

To ascend in spiral lines about a support; to climb spirally; as, many plants twine.

 

© Webster 1913.

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