One day I sat there in the rain

And asked my God to please explain

All the trouble through my life

Why put me through all this strife

To this my amazing God replied

Your trouble is because you haven't tried

But God I said up towards the sky

I haven't got the time to try

To this my God said to me

You haven't been what will, will be

Scoring a try is the ultimate aim of the games Rugby League, and Rugby Union. Tries have the highest point value in the game, and most of the time if you score more than the opposing team, you will win the game.

Naturally, the team you're playing against are doing everything in their power to stop you scoring that try.

Actually scoring a try is in principle a simple thing. A player from the attacking team must place the ball with downward pressure in the in-goal area of the defending team. The player scoring doesn't need to be in this area themselves, they're perfectly entitled to stretch out and place the ball on or over the goal line with one hand if need be - only the ball needs to find the ground. The player also must be themselves in the field of play when the ball is grounded. If a player is trying to score in the corner, defenders will normally not try to stop their progress, but rather push them over the sideline before they can get the ball down. This can lead to some spectacular diving tackles, sometimes the difference between scoring and not being a matter of centimetres.

Point values for a try vary between the two codes of rugby. Rugby League awards four points for a try, while Rugby Union awards five. The higher point value for a try in union is needed to provide greater incentive to try to score tries - in this code, penalty and field goals are worth three points. A one point advantage for the extra effort required to score a try is not enough - it's easier, and possibly more productive, to work into position for a field goal, or keep possession of the ball in the hope of being awarded a penalty.

In Rugby League, there are a couple of additional rules in relation to tries - rarely used, but they're available for the referee if need be. The first of these, is the 'eight point try'. Once a player has scored a try, the defending team are not permitted to tackle, or attack that player in any way. It's legal to attempt a tackle to try to stop the player scoring, or to force them to ground the ball without running closer to the goalposts (important when determining where the conversion is taken from) - but once the try is scored, they're to be left alone. If a defender does do something like that after the try is scored, the referee may award an additional penalty, on top of the try. This means that a regular conversion is taken from the point it would be normally, but then a penalty kick for goal can be taken from directly in front of the posts. Hence the term 'eight point try' doesn't refer to an automatic eight points - rather the possibility of scoring that many.

Another rule that is sometimes used in Rugby League and Union is the penalty try rule. If a defending player fouls an attacking player, and in the referee's opinion that foul stops the attacker scoring a certain try, a penalty try may be awarded. The attacking team is awarded the try, and the conversion is taken from directly in front of the posts. The most famous Rugby League penalty try in recent years was decided the 1999 NRL Grand final, played between the St. George - Illawarra Dragons, and the Melbourne Storm. In the final minutes of the game, trailing 18-14, the Storm's Scott Hill took the ball mid air, in the Dragons in-goal area, off a bomb kicked by Brett Kimmorley. All he had to do was fall to the ground, and plant the ball to draw the game, with the chance of winning it if the difficult conversion was successful. However, a high tackle by the Dragons Jamie Ainscough knocked him unconscious, forcing him to drop the ball. After consulting the video referee, field referee Bill Harrigan awarded a penalty try, giving the Storm the conversion from in front of the posts. The conversion was successful, and the Melbourne Storm took out the Grand Final, in only their second season as part of the league.



Thanks to caknuck for letting me know that Rugby Union also has a penalty try rule. If I've made any mistakes re the Rugby Union's interpretation of this rule, please let me know.

Try

(Programming::C++ term)

See Also: catch, throw, exception

In the C++ programming language, the try keyword can be used to encase a code block that may cause an exception. If an exception is caught while code is being processed within the try block, then a matching catch block is used to handle that exception. If no matching catch block is found, then the C++ Compiler will usually default to a built in generic exception handler.


To demonstrate a simple, self-contained C++ program that makes use of of a try/catch block:

    #include <iostream>
    using std::cout;

    // Empty class to THROW if a divide by zero is caught
    class XDivideByZero{ };

    int main ( int argc, char **argv ) {
        int result;
        int numberOne = 7;
        int numberTwo = 0;

        try {
            // Test to make sure that zero will not be used in division
            if (!numberTwo > 0)
                // THROW the emtpy class as the exception
                throw XDivideByZero();
            // The code should not reach this point!
            result = (numberOne / numberTwo);
            }

        catch (XDivideByZero) {
            // Handle the Divide By Zero Exception
            cout << "Exception caught: Divide By Zero!\n";
            // Exit with error status (1)
            return(1);
            }

        // The code should not reach this point!        
        cout << "No Errors: Result = " << result << std::endl;
        return(0);
        }


Try compiling and running this code. You should get output stating:

Exception caught: Divide By Zero!


Now, try compiling and running the following code (that does not contain a try/catch block):


    #include <iostream>
    using std::cout;

    int main ( int argc, char **argv ) {
        int result;
        int numberOne = 7;
        int numberTwo = 0;

        result = (numberOne / numberTwo);

        cout << "Result = " << result << std::endl;
        return(0);
        }


You will most likely receive some type of system error, maybe even multiple times. The try/catch block eliminates this error and allows the programmer to determine what should be done if such a situation does exist. In the earlier case (the example using the catch/try block), the program exits with an error code ( return(1) ). If you had dynamically allocated data, you would be able to remove it within the catch block. If no catch block was found, and depending upon your compiler, you may have just created a memory leak (unless of course a deconstructor is called to remove the allocated memory. This is beyond the scope of this section, and I encourage you reference such subjects; they will not, however, be discussed here.

try/catch blocks can be nested within each other (just like if statements and loop constructs).

When an exception is thrown in a try block, the program unwinds until it reaches an appropriate catch block. This means that once an exception is thrown, the execution of the program begins back-stepping through the program until it reaches a catch block.


Please view the node catch for more detailed information on what you can catch

Try (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. tried (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Trying.] [OE. trien to select, pick out, F. trier to cull, to out, LL. tritare to triturate (hence the sense of, to thresh, to separate the grain from the straw, to select), L. terere, tritum, to rub, bruise, grind, thresh. See Trite.]

1.

To divide or separate, as one sort from another; to winnow; to sift; to pick out; -- frequently followed by out; as, to try out the wild corn from the good. [Obs.] Sir T. Elyot.

2.

To purify or refine, as metals; to melt out, and procure in a pure state, as oil, tallow, lard, etc. Shak.

The words of the Lord are pure words: as silver tried in a furnace of earth, purified seven times.
Ps. xii. 6.

For thou, O God, hast proved us: thou hast tried us, as silver is tried.
Ps. lxvi. 10.

3.

To prove by experiment; to apply a test to, for the purpose of determining the quality; to examine; to prove; to test; as, to try weights or measures by a standard; to try a man's opinions.

Let the end try the man.
Shak.

4.

To subject to severe trial; to put to the test; to cause suffering or trouble to.

Thus far to try thee, Adam, I was pleased.
Milton.

5.

To experiment with; to test by use; as, to try a remedy for disease; to try a horse.

Come, try upon yourselves what you have seen me.
Shak.

To ease her cares the force of sleep she tries.
Swift.

6.

To strain; to subject to excessive tests; as, the light tries his eyes; repeated disappointments try one's patience.

7. (Law)

To examine or investigate judicially; to examine by witnesses or other judicial evidence and the principles of law; as, to try a cause, or a criminal.

8.

To settle; to decide; to determine; specifically, to decide by an appeal to arms; as, to try rival claims by a duel; to try conclusions.

Left I the court, to see this quarrel tried.
Shak.

9.

To experience; to have or gain knowledge of by experience. Milton.

Or try the Libyan heat or Scythian cold.
Dryden.

10.

To essay; to attempt; to endeavor.

Let us try . . . to found a path.
Milton.

To try on.
(a) To put on, as a garment, to ascertain whether it fits the person.
(b) To attempt; to undertake. [Slang] Dickens.

Syn. -- To attempt; endeavor; strive; aim; examine. -- Try, Attempt. To try is the generic, to attempt is the specific, term. When we try, we are usually uncertain as to success; when we attempt, we have always some definite object in view which we seek to accomplish. We may be indifferent as to the result of a trial, but we rarely attempt anything without a desire to succeed.

He first deceased: she for a little tried
To live without him; liked it not, and died.
Sir H. Wotton.

Alack, I am afraid they have a waked,
And 't is not done. The attempt, and not the deed,
Confounds us.
Shak.

 

© Webster 1913


Try (?), v. i.

1.

To exert strength; to endeavor; to make an effort or an attempt; as, you must try hard if you wish to learn.

2.

To do; to fare; as, how do you try! [Prov. Eng.]

 

© Webster 1913


Try, n.

1.

A screen, or sieve, for grain. [Obs. or Prov. Eng.] Holland.

2.

Act of trying; attempt; experiment; trial.

This breaking of his has been but a try for his friends.
Shak.

Try cock, a gauge cock. See under Gauge.

 

© Webster 1913


Try, a. [Cf. Try, v. t.]

Refined; select; excellent; choice. [Obs.] "Sugar that is try." Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913


Try, n.

In Rugby and Northern Union football, a score (counting three points) made by grounding the ball on or behind the opponent's goal line; -- so called because it entitles the side making it to a place kick for a goal (counting two points more if successful).

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.