Glossary of Scottish Dialect : C
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These definitions are taken from the “Glossary of Scottish Dialect” from The Harvard Classics volume 6, “The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns,” 1909. The volume is in the public domain. Aside from their inherent interest, they are valuable to anyone reading the work of Burns.


Ca’, call, knock, drive.
Cadger, a hawker (especially of fish).
Cadie, caddie, a fellow.
Caff, chaff.
Caird, a tinker.
Calf-ward, grazing plot for calves (i. e., churchyard).
Callan, callant, a stripling.
Caller, cool, refreshing.
Callet, a trull.
Cam, came.
Canie, cannie, gentle, tractable, quiet, prudent, careful.
Cankrie, crabbed.
Canna, can not.
Canniest, quietest.
Cannilie, cannily, quietly, prudently, cautiously.
Cantie, cheerful, lively, jolly, merry.
Cantraip, magic, witching.
Cants, merry stories, canters or sprees or merry doings.
Cape-stanc, copestone.
Capon, castrate.
Care na by, do not care.
Carl, carle, a man, an old man.
Carl-hemp, male-hemp.
Carlie, a manikin.
Carlin, carline, a middle-aged, or old, woman; a beldam, a witch.
Carmagnole, a violent Jacobin.
Cartes, playing-cards.
Cartie, dim. of cart.
Catch-the-plack, the hunt for money.
Caudron, a caldron.
Cauf, calf.
Cauf-leather, calf-leather.
Cauk, chalk.
Cauld, cold.
Cauldron, caldron.
Caup, a wooden drinking vessel.
Causey-cleaners, causeway-cleaners.
Cavie, a hen-coop.
Chamer, chaumer, chamber.
Change-house, tavern.
Chanter, bagpipes; the pipe of the bag-pipes which produces the melody; song.
Chap, a fellow, a young fellow.
Chap, to strike.
Chapman, a pedler.
Chaup, chap, a stroke, a blow.
Chear, cheer.
Chearfu’, cheerful.
Chearless, cheerless.
Cheary, cheery.
Cheek-for-chow, cheek-by-jowl (i. e., close beside).
Cheep, peep, squeak.
Chiel, chield (i. e., child), a fellow, a young fellow.
Chimla, chimney.
Chittering, shivering.
Chows, chews.
Chuck, a hen, a dear.
Chuckie, dim. of chuck, but usually signifies mother hen, an old dear.
Chuffie, fat-faced.
Chuse, to choose.
Cit, the civet.
Cit, a citizen, a merchant.
Clachan, a small village about a church.
Claeding, clothing.
Claes, claise, clothes.
Claith, cloth.
Claithing, clothing.
Clankie, a severe knock.
Clap, the clapper of a mill.
Clark, a clerk.
Clark, clerkly, scholarly.
Clarkit, clerked, wrote.
Clarty, dirty.
Clash, an idle tale; gossip.
Clash, to tattle.
Clatter, noise, tattle, talk, disputation, babble.
Clatter, to make a noise by striking; to babble; to prattle.
Claught, clutched, seized.
Claughtin, clutching, grasping.
Claut, a clutch, a handful.
Claut, to scrape.
Claver, clover.
Clavers, gossip, nonsense.
Claw, a scratch, a blow.
Claw, to scratch, to strike.
Clay-cauld, clay-cold.
Claymore, a two-handed Highland sword.
Cleckin, a brood.
Cleed, to clothe.
Cleek, to snatch.
Cleekit, linked arms.
Cleg, gadfly.
Clink, a sharp stroke; jingle.
Clink, money, coin.
Clink, to chink.
Clink, to rhyme.
Clinkin, with a smart motion.
Clinkum, clinkumbell, the beadle, the bellman.
Clips, shears.
Clish-ma-claver, gossip, taletelling; nonsense.
Clockin-time, clucking- (i. e., hatching-) time.
Cloot, the hoof.
Clootie, cloots, hoofie, hoofs (a nickname of the Devil).
Clour, a bump or swelling after a blow.
Clout, a cloth, a patch.
Clout, to patch.
Clud, a cloud.
Clunk, to make a hollow sound.
Coble, a broad and flat boat.
Cock, the mark (in curling).
Cockie, dim. of cock (applied to an old man).
Cocks, fellows, good fellows.
Cod, a pillow.
Coft, bought.
Cog, a wooden drinking vessel, a porridge dish, a corn measure for horses.
Coggie, dim. of cog, a little dish.
Coil, Coila, Kyle (one of the ancient districts of Ayrshire).
Collieshangie, a squabble.
Cood, cud.
Coof, v. cuif.
Cookit, hid.
Coor, cover.
Cooser, a courser, a stallion.
Coost (i. e., cast), looped, threw off, tossed, chucked.
Cootie, a small pail.
Cootie, leg-plumed.
Corbies, ravens, crows.
Core, corps.
Corn mou, corn heap.
Corn’t, fed with corn.
Corse, corpse.
Corss, cross.
Cou’dna, couldna, couldn’t.
Countra, country.
Coup, to capsize.
Couthie, couthy, loving, affable, cosy, comfortable.
Cowe, to scare, to daunt.
Cowe, to lop.
Crack, tale; a chat; talk.
Crack, to chat, to talk.
Craft, croft.
Craft-rig, croft-ridge.
Craig, the throat.
Craig, a crag.
Craigie, dim. of craig, the throat.
Craigy, craggy.
Craik, the corn-crake, the land-rail.
Crambo-clink, rhyme.
Crambo-jingle, rhyming.
Cran, the support for a pot or kettle.
Crankous, fretful.
Cranks, creakings.
Cranreuch, hoar-frost.
Crap, crop, top.
Craw, crow.
Creel, an osier basket.
Creepie-chair, stool of repentance.
Creeshie, greasy.
Crocks, old ewes.
Cronie, intimate friend.
Crooded, cooed.
Croods, coos.
Croon, moan, low.
Croon, to toll.
Crooning, humming.
Croose, crouse, cocksure, set, proud, cheerful.
Crouchie, hunchbacked.
Crousely, confidently.
Crowdie, meal and cold water, meal and milk, porridge.
Crowdie-time, porridge-time (i. e., breakfast-time).
Crowlin, crawling.
Crummie, a horned cow.
Crummock, cummock, a cudgel, a crooked staff.
Crump, crisp.
Crunt, a blow.
Cuddle, to fondle.
Cuif, coof, a dolt, a ninny; a dastard.
Cummock, v. crummock.
Curch, a kerchief for the head.
Curchie, a curtsy.
Curler, one who plays at curling.
Curmurring, commotion.
Curpin, the crupper of a horse.
Curple, the crupper (i. e., buttocks).
Cushat, the wood pigeon.
Custock, the pith of the colewort.
Cutes, feet, ankles.
Cutty, short.
Cutty-stools, stools of repentance.

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