The Stone Temple Pilots debut album. Track list as follows:
1 Dead & Bloated
2 Sex Type Thing
3 Wicked Garden
4 Sin
5 Naked Sunday
6 Creep
7 Piece of Pie
8 Plush
9 Wet My Bed
10 Crackerman
11 Where the River Goes


If you find any errors, please let me know.
Film Term:

A plastic hub used to hold film without a reel. There are 2 inch cores (small cores) and 3 inch cores (large cores). 2 inch cores can also be called camera cores.

Glossary of Film Terms - http://homepage.newschool.edu/~schlemoj/film_courses/glossary_of_film_terms/
reprinted with permission

The kernel dumps core for signals that imply a program error. Receipt of an interrupt signal implies that the user wants to prematurely terminate a process, which doesn't imply that anything is wrong; however, the quit signal induces a core dump even though it's initiated outside of the running process.

To obtain a core dump when a (Cisco) router crashes, use the exception dump ip-address config command, where ip address is the address of your TFTP server. Including this command in the config causes the router to attempt to make a core dump when it crashes. It is recommended that you use either RCP or FTP to dump the file to a server, because if you use TFTP, it will only dump the first 16 MB of the file. You can also configure the router to dump core and reboot when defined memory size parameters are violated, with the exception memory commands. If you don't want the router to reboot, you can cause the router to generate a core dump with write core.

It is one of the names that should never be given to important files. Sysadmins even have batch jobs that regularly find and delete anything named "core", assuming that it is just leftover crap from a program crash.

In computer labs there can be standing competitions for who gets the bigger core from a Netscape crash.

An acronym for Congress Of Racial Equality which was an influential activist group most visible in the civil rights demonstrations of the 1960s but is still active today.

A tube on which web materials (textiles, tape, paper, etc.) are wound. In U.S. industry, common inner diameter sizes are 1", 3", 6" and 12". Steel cores are often used for winding delicate foils, as the weight of a large roll of foil would break less durable cores, deforming and tearing the rolled material. Cardboard or plastic cores are usually used for tape, produced in lengths of 4-6 feet, cut down on a core cutter machine in normal tape widths before winding the tape on them.

copywronged = C = core cancer

core n.

Main storage or RAM. Dates from the days of ferrite-core memory; now archaic as techspeak most places outside IBM, but also still used in the Unix community and by old-time hackers or those who would sound like them. Some derived idioms are quite current; `in core', for example, means `in memory' (as opposed to `on disk'), and both core dump and the `core image' or `core file' produced by one are terms in favor. Some varieties of Commonwealth hackish prefer store.

--The Jargon File version 4.3.1, ed. ESR, autonoded by rescdsk.

Core (kOr), n. [F. corps. See Corps.]

A body of individuals; an assemblage. [Obs.]

He was in a core of people.
Bacon.

 

© Webster 1913


Core, n. [Cf. Chore.] (Mining.)

A miner's underground working time or shift. Raymond.

⇒ The twenty-four hours are divided into three or four cores.

 

© Webster 1913


Core, n. [Heb. kOr: cf. Gr. ko`ros.]

A Hebrew dry measure; a cor or homer. Num. xi. 32 (Douay version).

 

© Webster 1913


Core, n. [OF. cor, coer, cuer, F. cœur, fr. L. cor heart. See Heart.]

1.

The heart or inner part of a thing, as of a column, wall, rope, of a boil, etc.; especially, the central part of fruit, containing the kernels or seeds; as, the core of an apple or quince.

A fever at the core,
Fatal to him who bears, to all who ever bore.
Byron.

2.

The center or inner part, as of an open space; as, the core of a square. [Obs.] Sir W. Raleigh.

3.

The most important part of a thing; the essence; as, the core of a subject.

4. (Founding)

The portion of a mold which shapes the interior of a cylinder, tube, or other hollow casting, or which makes a hole in or through a casting; a part of the mold, made separate from and inserted in it, for shaping some part of the casting, the form of which is not determined by that of the pattern.

5.

A disorder of sheep occasioned by worms in the liver. [Prov. Eng.] Halliwell.

6. (Anat.)

The bony process which forms the central axis of the horns in many animals.

Core box (Founding), a box or mold, usually divisible, in which cores are molded. --
Core print (Founding), a projecting piece on a pattern which forms, in the mold, an impression for holding in place or steadying a core.

 

© Webster 1913


Core, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Cord (kOrd); p. pr. & vb. n. Coring.]

1.

To take out the core or inward parts of; as, to core an apple.

He's like a corn upon my great toe . . . he must be cored out.
Marston.

2.

To form by means of a core, as a hole in a casting.

 

© Webster 1913


Core, n. (Elec.)

A mass of iron, usually made of thin plates, upon which the conductor of an armature or of a transformer is wound.

 

© Webster 1913

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