British slang for "guy" or "dude". Such as: I haven't seen that chap for a while. Or: My, that chap has quite a gimpy leg.

Challenge Handshake Authentication Protocol, or CHAP, is one of two authentication protocols supported by PPP. Similar to PAP, CHAP is works with Link Control Protocol to authenticate a connection after the link establishment phase. Unlike its counterpart, however, CHAP constantly rechecks the validity of the connecting host to protect against unauthorized access. CHAP packets use a challenge system, meaning that authenticators transmit a challenge packet continuously until the connecting system responds with a packet containing a response. If this message contains a correct value, calculated using a hash function, the authenticator sends back a success packet. If not, the connection fails.
A CHAP packet header consists of 40 bits, composed of the following fields:

Code: The code field determines the function of the CHAP packet. Possible values are as follows:
1 - Challenge 2 - Response 3 - Success 4 - Failure

Identifier: The identifier field contains the actual information that determines whether or not a host will authorize the connection and allow it to take place.

Length: The length field is the total size of the packet, including the data field that follows the CHAP header.

The CHAP specification is fully defined in RFC 1994.

Chap (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Chapped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Chapping.] [See Chop to cut.]

1.

To cause to open in slits or chinks; to split; to cause the skin of to crack or become rough.

Then would unbalanced heat licentious reign, Crack the dry hill, and chap the russet plain. Blackmore.

Nor winter's blast chap her fair face. Lyly.

2.

To strike; to beat.

[Scot.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Chap, v. i.

1.

To crack or open in slits; as, the earth chaps; the hands chap.

2.

To strike; to knock; to rap.

[Scot.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Chap, n. [From Chap, v. t. & i.]

1.

A cleft, crack, or chink, as in the surface of the earth, or in the skin.

2.

A division; a breach, as in a party.

[Obs.]

Many clefts and chaps in our council board. T. Fuller.

3.

A blow; a rap.

[Scot.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Chap (?), n. [OE. chaft; of Scand. origin; cf. Icel kjaptr jaw, Sw. Kaft, D. kiaeft; akin to G. kiefer, and E. jowl. Cf. Chops.]

1.

One of the jaws or the fleshy covering of a jaw; -- commonly in the plural, and used of animals, and colloquially of human beings.

His chaps were all besmeared with crimson blood. Cowley.

He unseamed him [Macdonald] from the nave to the chaps. Shak.

2.

One of the jaws or cheeks of a vise, etc.

 

© Webster 1913.


Chap (?), n. [Perh. abbreviated fr. chapman, but used in a more general sense; or cf. Dan. kiaeft jaw, person, E. chap jaw.]

1.

A buyer; a chapman.

[Obs.]

If you want to sell, here is your chap. Steele.

2.

A man or boy; a youth; a fellow.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Chap, v. i. [See Cheapen.]

To bargain; to buy.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.

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