Glossary of Scottish Dialect : T

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These definitions are taken from the “Glossary of Scottish Dialect” from The Harvard Classics volume 6, “The Poems and Songs of Robert Burns,” 1909. The volume is in the public domain. Aside from their inherent interest, they are valuable to anyone reading the work of Burns.

Tack, possession, lease.
Tacket, shoe-nail.
Tae, to.
Tae, toe.
Tae’d, toed.
Taed, toad.
Taen, taken.
Taet, small quantity.
Tairge, to target.
Tak, take.
Tald, told.
Tane, one in contrast to other.
Tangs, tongs.
Tap, top.
Tapetless, senseless.
Tapmost, topmost.
Tappet-hen, a crested hen-shaped bottle holding three quarts of claret.
Tap-pickle, the grain at the top of the stalk.
Topsalteerie, topsy-turvy.
Targe, to examine.
Tarrow, to tarry; to be reluctant, to murmur; to weary.
Tassie, a goblet.
Tauk, talk.
Tauld, told.
Tawie, tractable.
Tawpie, a foolish woman.
Tawted, matted.
Teats, small quantities.
Teen, vexation.
Tell’d, told.
Temper-pin, a fiddle-peg; the regulating pin of the spinning-wheel.
Tent, heed.
Tent, to tend; to heed; to observe.
Tentie, watchful, careful, heedful.
Tentier, more watchful.
Tentless, careless.
Tester, an old silver coin about sixpence in value.
Teugh, tough.
Teuk, took.
Thack, thatch; thack and rape = the covering of a house, and so, home necessities.
Thae, those.
Thairm, small guts; catgut (a fiddle-string).
Theckit, thatched.
Thegither, together.
Thick, v. pack an’ thick.
Thieveless, forbidding, spiteful.
Thiggin, begging.
Thir, these.
Thirl’d, thrilled.
Thole, to endure; to suffer.
Thou’se, thou shalt.
Thowe, thaw.
Thowless, lazy, useless.
Thrang, busy; thronging in crowds.
Thrang, a throng.
Thrapple, the windpipe.
Thrave, twenty-four sheaves of corn.
Thraw, a twist.
Thraw, to twist; to turn; to thwart.
Thraws, throes.
Threap, maintain, argue.
Threesome, trio.
Thretteen, thirteen.
Thretty, thirty.
Thrissle, thistle.
Thristed, thirsted.
Through, mak to through = make good.
Throu’ther (through other), pell-mell.
Thummart, polecat.
Thy lane, alone.
Tight, girt, prepared.
Till, to.
Till’t, to it.
Timmer, timber, material.
Tine, to lose; to be lost.
Tinkler, tinker.
Tint, lost
Tippence, twopence.
Tip, v. toop.
Tirl, to strip.
Tirl, to knock for entrance.
Tither, the other.
Tittlin, whispering.
Tocher, dowry.
Tocher, to give a dowry.
Tocher-gude, marriage portion.
Tod, the fox.
To-fa’, the fall.
Toom, empty.
Toop, tup], ram.
Toss, the toast.
Toun, town; farm steading.
Tousie, shaggy.
Tout, blast.
Tow, flax, a rope.
Towmond, towmont, a twelvemonth.
Towsing, rumpling (equivocal).
Toyte, to totter.
Tozie, flushed with drink.
Trams, shafts.
Transmogrify, change.
Trashtrie, small trash.
Trews, trousers.
Trig, neat, trim.
Trinklin, flowing.
Trin’le, the wheel of a barrow.
Trogger, packman.
Troggin, wares.
Troke, to barter.
Trouse, trousers.
Trowth, in truth.
Trump, a jew's harp.
Tryste, a fair; a cattle-market.
Trysted, appointed.
Trysting, meeting.
Tulyie, tulzie, a squabble; a tussle.
Twa, two.
Twafauld, twofold, double.
Twal, twelve; the twal = twelve at night.
Twalpennie worth, a penny worth (English money).
Twang, twinge.
Twa-three, two or three.
Tway, two.
Twin, twine, to rob; to deprive; bereave.
Twistle, a twist; a sprain.
Tyke, a dog.
Tyne, v. tine.
Tysday, Tuesday.

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