Nadsat is a set of slang terms invented by Anthony Burgess in his 1962 novel A Clockwork Orange. The "slang of the future" used in the book has a variety of sources, most of the words being derived from Russian (many from bad transliterations of Russian as well). Other words have notably Germanic and Romance sources, some are abbreviations of English words, and some are forms of school-boy slang (or "potty talk") or Cockney rhyming slang. The name Nadsat itself is a Russian suffix for numbers 11-19 (equivalent to "teen" in the English numbering system). A doctor in the novel explains the slang as "odd bits of old rhyming slang", "A bit of gypsy talk, too." There are inconsistencies, however, in the use of the speech in the book when Alex forgets a word for something and instead uses a different one or makes up his own. Some words occur only as part of his idiolect.

Throughout the book Alex, the narrator and main character, thinks and speaks in Nadsat. The book is a difficult read the first time through due to the use of the slang terms, but context clues can help one to figure out what some of it means. The movie uncomplicates the language a little because there are visuals, but either way there may be quite a few mysterious terms for the everyday reader to figure out. For example, Alex says in one part of the novel: "But suddenly I viddied that thinking was for the gloopy ones and the oomny ones used like inspiration and what Bog sends... ". Below is a list of the words that are used in the novel that need defining, as well as the etymology of most of the words according to the author and related sources.

Hardlinked terms have further explication and/or contextual examples in separate nodes.

appy polly loggy - apology, derived from schoolboy speak.
baboochka - old woman, derived from the Russian word babooshka for grandmother.
baddiwad - bad, derived from schoolboy-speak.
banda - gang, derived from the Russian for same. See also: shaika.
bezoomny - Meaning insane, derived from Russian bezumnyj.
biblio - library, derived from the Russian for library, biblioteka, itself derived from the Greek biblio for book.
bitva - Russian for battle.
Bog - Russian for God.
bolnoy - Russian for sick.
bolshy - from the Russian bolshoy for big.
bratty - brother, derived from the Russian brat.
bratchny - bastard, derived from the Russian vnyebrachnyi for illegitimate. See also: sod.
britva - Russian for razor.
brooko - belly, derived from the Russian bryukho for abdomen.
brosay - throw, from the Russian word brosat.
bugatty - rich, derived from the Russian bogaty for wealthy.
cal - shit, derived from the Russian kal for excrement.
cancer - cigarette, likely derived from the British and Australian slang cancer stick.
cantora - office, derived from the Russian kontora.
carman - pocket, derived from the Russian karman.
chai - tea
charles, charlie - Chaplain/Priest, derived from Cockney rhyming slang: Chaplain -> Charlie Chaplin -> Charlie.
chasha - cup, derived from the Russian chashka
chasso - guard, derived from the Russian chasovoy for sentry
cheena - woman derived from the Russian zhenshcheena. See also: soomka
cheest - wash, derived from the Russian cheestit.
chelloveck - fellow, derived from the Russian chelovyek for person
chepooka - Russian for nonsense.
choodessny - wonderful, derived from the Russian choodesniyi for miraculous.
chumble - mumble, origin unknown.
clop - knock, derived from the German klopfen or Dutch kloppen for hit/knock.
cluve - beak, derived from the Russian klyuv
collocol - bell, derived from the Russian kolokol.
crark - yowl. Origin unknown.
crast - steal, derived from the Russian krast
creech - scream, from the Russian kreechat.
cutter - money, origin unknown. (Perhaps from Webster definition #6). See also: golly, deng, pretty polly
dama - Russian for lady.
ded - old man, Russian for grandfather.
deng - money, derived from the Russian dengi. See also: cutter, golly, pretty polly
devotchka - girl, derived from the Russian devochka. See also: ptitsa
dobby - good, derived from the Russian dobro. See also: horrorshow.
domy - house, from the Russian dom.
dook - ghost, ostensibly derived from a Gypsy word for magic. Also possibly from the Russian dukh for spirit.
dorogoy - valuable, derived from the Russian dorogoi for expensive.
drat - a fight, derived from the Russian for "to rip apart, to kill."
drencrom - a certain ficticious drug.
droog - friend, derived from the Russian. Plural is sometimes written as droogies.
dva - Russian for two.
eegra - game, derived from the Russian igra.
eemya - name, derived from the Russian imya.
eggiweg - egg, derived from schoolboy-slang.
em - Mother, derived from pronunciation of the first letter.
fagged - tired, derived from British slang.
filly - play, origin unknown.
firegold - a particular alcoholic drink.
forella - trout, derived from the Russian forel.
gazetta - newspaper, derived from the Russian gazeta.
glazz - eye, derived from the Russian glaz.
gloopy - stupid, derived from the Russian glupiyi for foolish.
godman - priest
golly - a unit of money, ostensibly related to lolly (British slang for money.) See also: cutter, deng.
goloss - voice, derived from the Russian golos.
goober - lip, derived from the Russian guba.
gooly - walk, derived from the Russian gulyat for stroll.
gorlo - Russian for throat.
govoreet - talk, derived from the Russian govorit.
grahzny - dirty, derived from the Russian gryuzniyi.
grazzy - dirty, derived from the Russian gryuzniyi..
gromky - loud, derived from the Russian gromkii.
groody - breast, derived from the Russian grud.
gruppa - Russian for group.
guff - laugh, an abbreviation of guffaw.
gulliver - the head, derived from the Russian golova.
guttiwuts - guts, derived from schoolboy-slang. See also: keeshkas.
hen-korm - chicken feed, derived from the Russian korm for animal feed.
horn - crying out, derived from the expression "sounding a horn."
horrorshow - good, from the Russian khorosho.
hound-and-horny - corny, derived from Cockney rhyming slang.
in-out in-out - sexual intercourse. See also: lubbilubbing.
interessovat - interesting, from the Russian interesovat.
itty - to go, derived from the Russian idti.
jammiwam - jam, taken from schoolboy-slang.
jeezny - life, derived from the Russian zhizn.
kartoffel - potatoes, from the Russian kartofel, itself from the German kartoffel.
keeshkas - guts, derived from the Russian kishka for intestines. See also: Guttiwuts.
kleb - Russian for bread.
klootch - key, derived from the Russian klyutch.
knopka - Russian for button.
korova - Russian for cow.
kopat - Russian for to dig.
koshka - Russian for cat. See also: kot.
kot - Russian for tomcat. See also: koshka.
krovvy - blood, derived from the Russian krov.
kupet - buy, from the Russian kupit.
lapa - Russian for paw.
lewdies - people, derived from the Russian lyudi.
lighter - crone, possibly derived from (old) blighter.
litso - Russian for face.
lomtick - slice, derived from the Russian lomtik (a slice of bread.) See also: shive.
loveted - caught, derived from the Russian lovit (to catch.)
lubbilubbing - making love, derived from the Russian lyublyu. See also: in-out-in-out.
luscious glory - hair, derived from Cockney rhyming slang: hair -> upper story -> luscious glory. See also: voloss.
malchick, malchikiwick - boy, derived from the Russian malchik.
malenky - little, derived from the Russian malyenkiyi for small.
maski - mask, from the Russian plural maski. maslo - Russian for butter.
merzky - filthy, derived from the Russian merzkiyi for loathsome, vile.
messel - thought, derived from the Russian misl.
mesto - Russian for place.
millicent - for policeman, derived from the Russian militsiya. See also: rozz.
minoota - minute, derived from the Russian minuta.
molodoy - Russian for young.
moloko - fictional drink made from milk and vodka; Russian for milk.
moodge - man, derived from the Russian muzhchina for male human being.
morder - snout, derived from the Russian morda.
mounch - snack, derived from munch.
mozg - Russian for brain.
nachinat - Russian for begin.
nadmenny - arrogant, derived from the Russian nadmenniyi.
nagoy - naked, derived from the Russian nagoi.
nazz - fool, derived from the Russian nazad meaning literally backwards.
neezhnies - underwear, derived from the Russian nizhniyi meaning lower.
nochy - night, derived from the Russian noch.
noga - Russian for foot.
nozh - Russian for knife.
nuking - smelling (of perfume), derived from the Russian nyukhat, to smell or whiff.
oddy knocky - lonesome, derived from the Russian odinok.
odin - Russian for one.
okno - Russian for window.
oobivat - to kill, derived from the Russian ubivat.
ookadeet - to leave, derived from the Russian ukhodit.
ooko - ear, derived from the Russian ukho.
oomny - clever, derived from the Russian umniyi.
oozhassny - terrible, derived from the Russian ukhasniyi.
oozy - chain, from the archaic Russian uzhyi, chains of bondage.
orange man - orangutan, a literal translation from the Malay.
osoosh - dry, derived from the Russian osushat.
otchkies - eyeglasses, derived from the Russian otchki.
pan-handle - erection, origin unknown but probably the obvious.
pee - father, from the first letter of Papa.
pishcha - food, derived from the Russian pisha.
platch - cry, derived from the Russian plakat.
platties - clothes, derived from the Russian platye.
plenny - prisoner, derived from the Russian plenniyi.
plesk - splash, derived from the Russian pleskat.
pletcho - Russian for shoulder.
plott - flesh, derived from the Russian plot.
podooshka - pillow, derived from the Russian podushka.
pol - Russian for gender.
polezny - useful, derived from the Russian polezniyi.
polyclef - skeleton key, from poly (many) and clef (key).
pony - understand, derived from the Russian ponimat.
poogly - scared, derived from the Russian pugat, to frighten.
pooshka - gun, derived from the Russian pushka for cannon.
pop-disk - a pop music record, many of which may bear a strong resemblance to soundtracks to Stanley Kubrick movies.
prestoopnick - criminal. Derived from Russian prestupnik.
pretty polly - money, from Cockney rhyming slang for lolly.
privodeet - "to lead," derived from the Russian privodit.
prod - to produce, shortened.
ptitsa - girl, derived from the Russian for bird.
pyahnitsa - drunk, derived from the Russian for drunkard.
radosty - joy, from the Russian radost.
raskazz - story, derived from the Russian rasskaz.
rassoodock - mind, derived from the Russian rassudok, meaning sanity or common sense.
raz - time, derived from the Russian for occasion.
razdraz - upset, derived from the Russian razdrazhat, to irritate.
razrez - rip, derived from the Russian razrvat.
rooker - hand, derived from the Russian ruka.
rot - Russian for mouth.
rozz - policeman, derived from the Russian rozha for grimace or ugly face.
sabog - shoe, possibly derived from the French sabot or the Russian sapog for a style of tall shoe.
sammy - generous, derived from the Russian samoye for "the most."
sarky - sarcastic - shortened slang.
scoteena - cow, derived from the Russian skotina for brute or beast.
shaika - gang, derived from the Russian for band of thieves.
sharp - female, origin unknown.
sharries - balls, derived from the Russian shariki for marbles.
shest - Russian for pole.
shilarny - concern, origin unknown.
shive - slice, derived from the same root as a shiv.
shiyah - neck, derived from the Russian shyeya.
shlaga - club, derived possibly from the German schl├Ąger for "something you hit with".
shlapa - hat, derived from the Russian shlyupa.
shlem - Russian for helmet.
shoom - noise, derived from the Russian shum.
shoot - to fool, derived from the Russian shutit.
sinny - movies, derived from cinema.
skazat - Russian for say.
skolliwoll - school, derived from schoolboy-slang.
skorry - quick, derived from the Russian skori.
skriking - scratching, possibly a mix of scratching and striking.
skvat - grab, derived from the Russian khvatat, to snatch.
sladky - sweet, derived from the Russian sladkiyi.
sloochat - happen, derived from the Russiancsluchatsya.
slooshy - hear, derived from the Russian slushat.
slovo - Russian for word.
smeck - laugh, derived from the Russian smekh.
smot - look, derived from the Russian smotret.
sneety - dream, derived from the Russian snitsya.
snoutie - tobacco, perhaps derived from snout by association with snuff tobacco.
snuff - being killed or dying, from the extinguishing of a candle.
sobirat - Russian for to collect.
sod - bastard, derived from English slang.
soomka - woman, derived from the Russian sumka for bag.
soviet - advice, derived from the Russian sovyet for council.
spatchka - sleep, derived from the Russian spat.
spoogy - terrified, derived from the Russian spugivat, to frighten.
Staja - state jail - a condensation.
starry - old, from the Russian stariyi.
strack - horror, from the Russian strakh for fear.
synthemesc - Milk fortified with synthetic mescaline.
tally - waist, derived from the Russian taliya, itself taken from the French.
tashtook - handkerchief, derived from the German Taschentuch.
tass - cup, derived from the French tasse.
tolchock - hit, derived from the Russian tolchok, a push or shove.
toofles - slippers, derived from the Russian tuflya.
tree - three, derived from the Russian tri (or from any other Indo-European language actually).
vareet - to cook, derived from the Russian varit.
vaysay - washroom, toilet derived from the French pronunciation of the English abbreviation W.C.
veck - guy, derived from the Russian chelovyek for person.
vellocet - a ficticious drug, seemingly speed or some other amphetamine.
veshch - thing, derived from the Russian vesh.
viddy - see, derived from the Russian vidyet.
voloss - hair, derived from the Russian volos.
von - Russian for stink.
vred - Russian for harm.
yahma - hole, derived from the Russian yama.
yahzick - Russian for tongue.
yahoody - Jew, as in Hebrew and other semitic languages (cf. yehuda, Jude).
yarbles - testicles, probably a mix of the Russian yiytsa (eggs) and the English marbles.
yeckate - drive, derived from the Russian echatz, to go using a vehicle.
zammechat - remarkable, from the Russian zamechat, to notice or remark.
zasnoot - sleep, derived from the Russian zasnut.
zheena - wife, derived from the Russian zhena.
zoobies - teeth, derived from the Russian zubi.
zvonock - doorbell, from the Russian zvonit, to ring.
zvook - sound, from the Russian zvuk.

Credit where credit is due: This list has come a long way. Most of the words were originally individually noded by Pseudo_Intellectual. The re-formatting of about half the words as a list (as well as some research) was taken up by alex. I then finished re-formatting and researching what was left on the list and added the foreword explaining what it was. A number of words were added to the list in the course of research. If there are any discrepancies in the list (I know the book, but I don't know Russian) please /msg me. I will have a native speaker of Russian see the list shortly.

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