Something everythingians don't have time to do (but have time to node!)

Also, Fullbore Target Rifle Shooting terminology meaning the bullet has failed to hit the target on or within the bounding line along the perimiter.

This will score you 0 points.

Also: Wash-out.

Other Scoring Terminology: Centre-bull, V-Bull, Bullseye-Five, Inner-Four, Magpie-Three, Outer-Two, Hit-One

Target Rifle Shooting...

In the desert, a wash is a normally dry watercourse. Usually these are wide and sandy, although at times they can go through narrow canyons. Although usually dry, washes are often charactarized by severe flash floods. Since there is little vegetation in the desert, when it does get one of its rare, but heavy, summer thunderstorms, all the water falling on the mountainous areas quickly pours into canyons and fills the washes. They are known for having walls of water at least 10 feet high come down them in some cases. Often the wall of water continues to areas which havent seen any rain at all. So, if there is a thunderstorm nearby, you should probably avoid washes. If you're sure it isnt raining upstream, washes are excellent places to explore and wander around, especially after one has recently had water in it. They are filled with fine sand, often which is sculpted into really neat patterns by water and wind. Wildlife frequents washes, and there are usually many tracks of animals such as coyotes, snakes, lizards or birds in the sand. When a wash exits the mountain, it usually forms a slope called an alluvial fan where it deposits all the stuff it scoured out of the mountain. Upstream from this, where the wash comes out of the mountains, there is often a steep canyon. Sometimes springs are found in these areas as water under the sand is forced to the surface. Springs in the desert are easy to find.. they are surrounded by cottonwoods, willows, and other riparian plants and are usually the only green thing around.

Some of the coolest washes i have visited have been in Joshua Tree National Park, the Mojave Desert, Death Valley, and below the White Mountains. This is just in California.. there are many neat canyons in Utah and Arizona as well. unfortunately i havent visited deserts outside the US yet, but apparently the desert around the Andes is awesome. In the Sahara, there are actually old rivers buried under the sand, that formed long ago when it was wetter.

Art term. It is a technique of diluting a color and spreading it thinly over another color, so as both colors can be seen.

In watercolor, a wash of just water can be spread over bare paper to make the surface ready to receive color and possibly let it run to the edges of the wetness. I kind of like to think of that as artistic foreplay, myself.

In a theatre, a wash is a general cover of light in a specific colour. For example, a lighting rig may consist of two or three different colour washes, plus a few specials.

Normally, the two main washes are a warm (orange or straw) and a cold (blue) wash. These can create very different feels for a scene.


If you're after any other theatre tech information, then do take a look at 'Everything you ever wanted to know about theatre tech, but were afraid to ask'
WASH
Paint for the face, or cosmetic water. Hog-wash; thick and bad beer.

The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Wash (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Washed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Washing.] [OE. waschen, AS. wascan; akin to D. wasschen, G. waschen, OHG. wascan, Icel. & Sw. vaska, Dan. vaske, and perhaps to E. water. &root;150.]

1.

To cleanse by ablution, or dipping or rubbing in water; to apply water or other liquid to for the purpose of cleansing; to scrub with water, etc., or as with water; as, to wash the hands or body; to wash garments; to wash sheep or wool; to wash the pavement or floor; to wash the bark of trees.

When Pilate saw that he could prevail nothing, . . . he took water and washed his hands before the multitude, saying, I am innocent of the blood of this just person. Matt. xxvii. 24.

2.

To cover with water or any liquid; to wet; to fall on and moisten; hence, to overflow or dash against; as, waves wash the shore.

Fresh-blown roses washed with dew. Milton.

[The landscape] washed with a cold, gray mist. Longfellow.

3.

To waste or abrade by the force of water in motion; as, heavy rains wash a road or an embankment.

<-- now, wash out. -->

4.

To remove by washing to take away by, or as by, the action of water; to drag or draw off as by the tide; -- often with away, off, out, etc.; as, to wash dirt from the hands.

Arise, and be baptized, and wash away thy sins. Acts xxii. 16.

The tide will wash you off. Shak.

5.

To cover with a thin or watery coat of color; to tint lightly and thinly.

6.

To overlay with a thin coat of metal; as, steel washed with silver.

To wash gold, etc., to treat earth or gravel, or crushed ore, with water, in order to separate the gold or other metal, or metallic ore, through their superior gravity. -- To wash the hands of. See under Hand.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wash, v. i.

1.

To perform the act of ablution.

Wash in Jordan seven times. 2 Kings v. 10.

2.

To clean anything by rubbing or dipping it in water; to perform the business of cleansing clothes, ore, etc., in water.

"She can wash and scour."

Shak.

3.

To bear without injury the operation of being washed; as, some calicoes do not wash.

[Colloq.]

4.

To be wasted or worn away by the action of water, as by a running or overflowing stream, or by the dashing of the sea; -- said of road, a beach, etc.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wash, n.

1.

The act of washing; an ablution; a cleansing, wetting, or dashing with water; hence, a quantity, as of clothes, washed at once.

2.

A piece of ground washed by the action of a sea or river, or sometimes covered and sometimes left dry; the shallowest part of a river, or arm of the sea; also, a bog; a marsh; a fen; as, the washes in Lincolnshire.

"The Wash of Edmonton so gay."

Cowper.

These Lincoln washes have devoured them. Shak.

3.

Substances collected and deposited by the action of water; as, the wash of a sewer, of a river, etc.

The wash of pastures, fields, commons, and roads, where rain water hath a long time settled. Mortimer.

4.

Waste liquid, the refuse of food, the collection from washed dishes, etc., from a kitchen, often used as food for pigs.

Shak.

5. Distilling (a)

The fermented wort before the spirit is extracted.

(b)

A mixture of dunder, molasses, water, and scummings, used in the West Indies for distillation.

B. Edwards.

6.

That with which anything is washed, or wetted, smeared, tinted, etc., upon the surface.

Specifically: --

(a)

A liquid cosmetic for the complexion.

(b)

A liquid dentifrice.

(c)

A liquid preparation for the hair; as, a hair wash.

(d)

A medical preparation in a liquid form for external application; a lotion.

(e) Painting

A thin coat of color, esp.

water color.

(j) A thin coat of metal laid on anything for beauty or preservation.

7. Naut. (a)

The blade of an oar, or the thin part which enters the water.

(b)

The backward current or disturbed water caused by the action of oars, or of a steamer's screw or paddles, etc.

8.

The flow, swash, or breaking of a body of water, as a wave; also, the sound of it.

9.

Ten strikes, or bushels, of oysters.

[Prov. Eng.]

Wash ball, a ball of soap to be used in washing the hands or face. Swift. -- Wash barrel Fisheries, a barrel nearly full of split mackerel, loosely put in, and afterward filled with salt water in order to soak the blood from the fish before salting. -- Wash bottle. Chem. (a) A bottle partially filled with some liquid through which gases are passed for the purpose of purifying them, especially by removing soluble constituents. (b) A washing bottle. See under Washing. -- Wash gilding. See Water gilding. -- Wash leather, split sheepskin dressed with oil, in imitation of chamois, or shammy, and used for dusting, cleaning glass or plate, etc.; also, alumed, or buff, leather for soldiers' belts.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wash, a.

1

Washy; weak.

[Obs.]

Their bodies of so weak and wash a temper. Beau. & Fl.

2.

Capable of being washed without injury; washable; as, wash goods.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Wash, v. t.

1.

To cause dephosphorisation of (molten pig iron) by adding substances containing iron oxide, and sometimes manganese oxide.

2.

To pass (a gas or gaseous mixture) through or over a liquid for the purpose of purifying it, esp. by removing soluble constituents.

 

© Webster 1913


Wash, v. i.

1.

To use washes, as for the face or hair.

2.

To move with a lapping or swashing sound, or the like; to lap; splash; as, to hear the water washing.

 

© Webster 1913


Wash, n.

1. [Western U. S.] (Geol.)

(a)

Gravel and other rock débris transported and deposited by running water; coarse alluvium.

(b)

An alluvial cone formed by a stream at the base of a mountain.

2.

The dry bed of an intermittent stream, sometimes at the bottom of a cañon; as, the Amargosa wash, Diamond wash; -- called also dry wash. [Western U. S.]

3. (Arch.)

The upper surface of a member or material when given a slope to shed water. Hence, a structure or receptacle shaped so as to receive and carry off water, as a carriage wash in a stable.

 

© Webster 1913

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