To continue to reclaim the node from the lyric transcribers…

In pinball, a “Special” is a certain extremely rare and valuable type of award which, on most machines, is worth a free game, or replay. Usually, to earn a Special the player must perform some rather difficult task then hit a particular difficult shot, although a few games (such as Party Zone) light a Special randomly (though infrequently). Specials are popular awards to light as a result of Wizard Mode. Also, a popular place to light a Special is an outlane, where, if collected, the player loses a ball but earns a credit.

While, on the vast majority of machines, a Special is a replay, operators can usually select what a Special is worth, with alternatives being Extra Ball and some number of points (usually pitiful). Machines which have a Tournament Mode almost always award something other than a free game for a Special, since all awards must be reflected in the scoring somehow to make the score an accurate measure of skill.

(You can probably get these all over the world, I've just never seen them any place else except Derry)

A dish made from a layer of rice with a layer of chips (fries for all you crazy Americans) on top, all covered in lots of curry sauce. When I say covered in curry sauce here, I mean it. It would appear that to make a special the container is filled with hot curry sauce, then as an afterthought some rice and chips are added.

Although the first few mouthfuls will taste pretty good to the slightly intoxicated teen, only the fully intoxicated can easily manage a full one.

Some people find that they taste like acid.

They are available in most chip shops in Derry (N. Ireland) and I would imagine in many other places in the British Isles. Finding a special away from these shores is probably rare as most of the civilised world appreciates good food.

Spe"cial (?), a. [L. specialis, fr. species a particular sort, kind, or quality: cf. F. sp'ecial. See Species, and cf. Especial.]

1.

Of or pertaining to a species; constituting a species or sort.

A special is called by the schools a "species". I. Watts.

2.

Particular; peculiar; different from others; extraordinary; uncommon.

Our Savior is represented everywhere in Scripture as the special patron of the poor and the afficted. Atterbury.

To this special evil an improvement of style would apply a special redress. De Quincey.

3.

Appropriate; designed for a particular purpose, occasion, or person; as, a special act of Parliament or of Congress; a special sermon.

4.

Limited in range; confined to a definite field of action, investigation, or discussion; as, a special dictionary of commercial terms; a special branch of study.

5.

Chief in excellence.

[Obs.]

The king hath drawn The special head of all the land together. Shak.

Special administration Law, an administration limited to certain specified effects or acts, or one granted during a particular time or the existence of a special cause, as during a controversy respecting the probate of a will, or the right of administration, etc. -- Special agency, an agency confined to some particular matter. -- Special bail, Bail above, ∨ Bail to the action Law, sureties who undertake that, if the defendant is convicted, he shall satisfy the plaintiff, or surrender himself into custody. Tomlins. Wharton (Law Dict.). -- Special constable. See under Constable. Bouvier. -- Special damage Law, a damage resulting from the act complained of, as a natural, but not the necessary, consequence of it. -- Special demurrer Law, a demurrer for some defect of form in the opposite party pleading, in which the cause of demurrer is particularly stated. -- Special deposit, a deposit made of a specific thing to be kept distinct from others. -- Special homology. Biol. See under Homology. -- Special injuction Law, an injuction granted on special grounds, arising of the circumstances of the case. Daniell. -- Special issue Law, an issue produced upon a special plea. Stephen. -- Special jury Law, a jury consisting of persons of some particular calling, station, or qualification, which is called upon motion of either party when the cause is supposed to require it; a struck jury. -- Special orders Mil., orders which do not concern, and are not published to, the whole command, such as those relating to the movement of a particular corps, a detail, a temporary camp, etc. -- Special partner, a limited partner; a partner with a limited or restricted responsibility; -- unknown at common law. -- Special partnership, a limited or particular partnership; -- a term sometimes applied to a partnership in a particular business, operation, or adventure. -- Special plea in bar Law, a plea setting forth particular and new matter, distinguished from the general issue. Bouvier. -- Special pleader Law, originally, a counsel who devoted himself to drawing special counts and pleas; in a wider sense, a lawyer who draws pleadings. -- Special pleading Law, the allegation of special or new matter, as distingiushed from a direct denial of matter previously alleged on the side. Bouvier. The popular denomination of the whole science of pleading. Stephen. The phrase is sometimes popularly applied to the specious, but unsound, argumentation of one whose aim is victory, and not truth. Burrill. -- Special property Law, a qualified or limited ownership possession, as in wild animals, things found or bailed. -- Special session, an extraordinary session; a session at an unusual time or for an unusual purpose; as, a special session of Congress or of a legislature. -- Special statute, ∨ Special law, an act of the legislature which has reference to a particular person, place, or interest; -- in distinction from a general law. -- Special verdict Law, a special finding of the facts of the case, leaving to the court the application of the law to them. Wharton (Law Dict.).

Syn. -- Peculiar; appropriate; specific; dictinctive; particular; exceptional; singular. See Peculiar.

 

© Webster 1913.


Spe"cial, n.

1.

A particular.

[Obs.]

Hammond.

2.

One appointed for a special service or occasion.

In special, specially; in particular. Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.

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