The twenty-fourth book of the Old Testament.

Chapters: 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9 | 10 | 11 | 12 | 13 | 14 | 15 | 16 | 17 | 18 | 19 | 20 | 21 | 22 | 23 | 24 | 25 | 26 | 27 | 28 | 29 | 30 | 31 | 32 | 33 | 34 | 35 | 36 | 37 | 38 | 39 | 40 | 41 | 42 | 43 | 44 | 45 | 46 | 47 | 48 | 49 | 50 | 51 | 52 |

Previous book: Isaiah | Next book: Lamentations
King James Bible
Jeremiah, means "high of the Lord" in Hebrew.

He was one of the major prophets of the Old Testament, and author of the Book of Jeremiah and (supposedly) the Book of Lamentations.

Matthew Henry's Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible
Book: Jeremiah
Chapters: 1 · 2 · 3 · 4 · 5 · 6 · 7 · 8 · 9 · 10 · 11 · 12 · 13 · 14 · 15 · 16 · 17 · 18 · 19 · 20 · 21 · 22 · 23 · 24 · 25 · 26 · 27 · 28 · 29 · 30 · 31 · 32 · 33 · 34 · 35 · 36 · 37 · 38 · 39 · 40 · 41 · 42 · 43 · 44 · 45 · 46 · 47 · 48 · 49 · 50 · 51 · 52 ·

Jeremiah was a Priest, a native of Anathoth, in the Tribe of
Benjamin. He was called to the prophetic office when very young,
about seventy years after the Death of Isaiah, and exercised it
for about forty years with great faithfulness, till the sins of
the Jewish nation came to their full Measure and Destruction
followed. The prophecies of Jeremiah do not stand as they were
delivered. Blayney has endeavoured to arrange them in more
regular order, namely, ch. 1-20; 22; 23; 25; 26; 35; 36; 45; 24;
29; 30; 31; 27; 28; 21; 34; 37; 32; 33; 38; 39; (ver. 15-18,
1-14.)
40-44; 46-52. The general subject of his prophecies is
the Idolatry and other sins of the Jews; the judgments By which
they were threatened, with references to their future
restoration and deliverance, and promises of the Messiah. They
are remarkable for Plain and Faithful reproofs, affectionate
expostulations, and awful warnings.

Television series (2002 - 2004) airing on the Showtime Cable TV network in the US and syndicated to various channels in other countries, based on the graphic novel of the same name by Hermann Huppen, and written/produced by J. Michael Straczynski (creator of Babylon 5) and Sam Egan (producer of Showtime's 1990's version of The Outer Limits).

Set in the near future, approximately fifteen years after The Big Death, a plague that killed everyone past puberty, the series follows Jeremiah (played by Luke Perry of Beverly Hills 90210 fame) and his friend Kurdy (Malcolm Jamal-Warner from The Cosby Show), in the world created by the children who survived. The series opener shows how the two meet and how they end up finding a group of survivors who have taken over Thunder Mountain, the name they have given to the NORAD facility buried in Cheyenne Mountain in Colorado (as made famous in movies such as WarGames). Jeremiah and Kurdy spend the rest of the first season working for the Thunder Mountain group, going out to seek information and make alliances with other groups of survivors. Jeremiah is also looking for information about Valhalla Sector, a place that his father was taking their family to for protection from the virus - but his father disappeared before they could make it.

In the second season, which originally aired late 2003 and early 2004, Jeremiah and Kurdy are joined by several newcomers, including Mister Smith (played by Sean Astin, fresh from his role as Samwise Gamgee in the Lord of the Rings movies), and new plot developments, as they start hearing stories of someone named Daniel, who is building his own empire in the eastern U.S.

The thunder will change you forever, but everyone you love will fall at the end of the world.
- Ezekiel

Jeremiah is a very bright view on a dark future. The post-apocalyptic world that Jeremiah and Kurdy are native to is not at all populated with depressed and sinister characters, but rather with a lot of hoping and enthusiastic people. Jeremiah himself at first hasn't quite a clue what he wants to achive, just a very vague idea to find out about what happened to his father, and with his involvement into Thunder Mountain the story evolves. Very much like the show JMS got famous for, Babylon 5, Jeremiah has a very distinct direction that reveals itself while the story progresses. Although the show's setup might be clear after the first season, the destiny of Jeremiah himself is yet to be discovered.

Jeremiah himself is a prototypical anti-hero. Perry acts him as very self-assure lone runner with a certain heroish touch. His obsession is to find Valhalla Sector/his father.
When Kurdy tries to steal some fish from him, Jeremiah defines his own stereotype: He first beats him and ties him to a tree, but eventually talks to him and gives him some of the food. He really get's into this tough-guy-who-doesn't-wanna-save-the-world-but-just-has-to-thing. Later on, he also shows responsibility and some sort of odd humor, and in the end the audience grows to like him.

Characters:

Jeremiah          (Luke Perry)
Kurdy             (Malcolm-Jamal Warner)
Mr. Smith         (Sean Astin)
Markus Alexander  (Peter Stebbings)
Erin              (Ingrid Kavelaars)
Theo              (Kim Hawthorne)
Lee Chen          (Byron Lawson)
Thesp             (Joanne Kelly)
Ezekiel           (Alex Zahara)
Elizabeth Munroe  (Kandyse McClure)

Episodes:

01 & 02 (Pilot)
The Long Road
03
Man of Iron, Woman Under Glass
04
And the Ground Sown with Salt
05
To Sail Beyond the Stars
06
The Bag
07
City of Roses
08
Firewall
09
The Red Kiss
10
Journeys End In Lovers Meeting
11
Thieves Honor
12
The Touch
13
Mother of Invention
14
Tripwire
15
The Ring of Truth
16
Moon In Gemini
17
Out of the Ashes
18
A Means to an End
19
Things left unsaid (1)
20
Things left unsaid (2)

Feel free to create nodes for the episodes and to post them.

Related Write-Ups

The Big Death

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