I'm not wrathful

I'm kind
and gentle
understanding
and self sacrificing

Until the self, tired of bleeding itself dry
rebels

Wrath is orange
and red
and sometimes black

And as cold
and as frozen
as a cruel lover's heart

Se7en's Deadly Sins

(John Doe) She begged for her life, David. For her life and the life of the baby inside her. Become vengance, David. Become wrath.

All at once, our villian is dead. Dead with his hands cuffed and feet chained, helpless as we felt when we watched his captives try to catch him, when in the end only were able to when he wanted to be caught, when he wished to die. To go no longer into this life.

(Somerset) Ernest Hemingway once said that the world is a fine place and worth fighting for. I agree with the second part.

I think about a man who would walk in on his wife having an affair and he had a gun, he'd likely shoot the other man. I've never understood this, so maybe I haven't come in contact with wrath much in my life. I get more angry at things people do, with concepts and ideas that kick start the evolution in people's minds.

And yet, the wrath we have most easily is the kind that accomplishes the current situation. Wrath is trigger short on attention span, something we act on when the circumstances are set up just so. When our temper can become predictable and people know how to push our buttons, our truth is known and we are angered even with being found out. And yet we seem indifferent on how to fix it.

Go back to:
Avarice
Envy
Pride
Lust
Gluttony
Sloth

Wrath ]

1.

Violent anger; vehement exasperation; indignation; rage; fury; ire.

Wrath is a fire, and jealousy a weed. Spenser.

When the wrath of king Ahasuerus was appeased. Esther ii. 1.

Now smoking and frothing Its tumult and wrath in. Southey.

2.

The effects of anger or indignation; the just punishment of an offense or a crime.

"A revenger to execute wrath upon him that doeth evil."

Rom. xiii. 4.

Syn. -- Anger; fury; rage; ire; vengeance; indignation; resentment; passion. See Anger.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wrath, a.

See Wroth.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Wrath, v. t.

To anger; to enrage; -- also used impersonally.

[Obs.] "I will not wrathen him."

Chaucer.

If him wratheth, be ywar and his way shun. Piers Plowman.

 

© Webster 1913.

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