Hearsay. Some juicy nugget of information which spreads, whether true or not. Some of the better gossip comes from Slashdot, in the comments if not the news stories. Most of the Planet websites (planetquake et al) are hives of gossip.

Something that men would always declare as a "womanish" activity and deny any association with whatsoever, but end up doing themselves anyways in a subtle manner. Gossip, other than the content of the often false or wildly exaggerated rumors that are spread around by word of mouth, is also the act of spreading the rumor. Women do this. A lot.

In my office, at every lunch hour all the women shuffle off to their own little room to eat lunch, where they gossip for an hour. The subject of their conversation is unknown. All I know is, they stop talking when I or any other male enters the room. I don't know why that is either. Occasionally, I hear sounds of giggling and laughing coming out of there, but nothing else. They seem to enjoy it immensely.

Men's gossip is done without all the giggling, but it's done nonetheless. In my experience, men's gossip is liberally mixed with profanity, crude jokes, and bragging. I don't enjoy gossip because most of the time I don't care, but if it's about someone I know then I'm always interested. Curiosity killed the cat.

Gossip can be interesting, but it sucks if it's about you. That's all I know.

Gossip is also a well crafted movie about the repercussions of malicious gossip on an intended victim. In this case, a fellow college student, played by Kate Hudson, is the recipient of rumors which circulate to the degree of truth, that is, they may as well be true for everyone believes them to be so. It's like this gossip has a life of its own. And it does; it's a communication class project, designed to test the strength and trace the route of said gossip.

Having planted the seeds of gossip before, and well aware of its implications, three students decide to spread rumors with sexual innuendoes and watch with glee its permutations. These instigators are played by James Marsden, Norman Reedus, and the always intriguing Lena Headey. It radiates with the intensity of "Less than Zero", and builds to an ending no one would have foreseen in the beginning. Miss Hudson demonstrates, once again, that she has the talent needed to succeed even without the help of a famous mother (Goldie Hawn).

Written by Gregory Poirer and Theresa Rebeck and directed by Davis Guggenheim, it's a film about gossip which spreads like wildfire with the results that fire usually leaves; someone gets really badly burned. But so as not to spoil the show, I'll only say the winds which fuel this fire are as unpredictable as most.


Sources:http://us.imdb.com/Details?0176783
Gossip (2000) James Marsden, Lena Headey, Norman Reedus, Kate Hudson - PopMatters Film Review.htm

Gos"sip (?), n. [OE. gossib, godsib, a relation or sponsor in baptism, a relation by a religious obligation, AS. godsibb, fr. god + sib alliance, relation; akin to G. sippe, Goth. sibja, and also to Skr. sabha assembly.]

1.

A sponsor; a godfather or a godmother.

Should a great lady that was invited to be a gossip, in her place send her kitchen maid, 't would be ill taken. Selden.

2.

A friend or comrade; a companion; a familiar and customary acquaintance.

[Obs.]

My noble gossips, ye have been too prodigal. Shak.

3.

One who runs house to house, tattling and telling news; an idle tattler.

The common chat of gossips when they meet. Dryden.

4.

The tattle of a gossip; groundless rumor.

Bubbles o'er like a city with gossip, scandal, and spite. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gos"sip, v. t.

To stand sponsor to.

[Obs.]

Shak.

 

© Webster 1913.


Gos"sip, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Gossiped (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Gossiping.]

1.

To make merry.

[Obs.]

Shak.

2.

To prate; to chat; to talk much.

Shak.

3.

To run about and tattle; to tell idle tales.

 

© Webster 1913.

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