Flirt (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Flirted; p. pr. & vb. n. Flirting.] [Cf. AS. fleard trifle, folly, fleardian to trifle.]

1.

To throw with a jerk or quick effort; to fling suddenly; as, they flirt water in each other's faces; he flirted a glove, or a handkerchief.

2.

To toss or throw about; to move playfully to and fro; as, to flirt a fan.

3.

To jeer at; to treat with contempt; to mock.

[Obs.]

I am ashamed; I am scorned; I am flirted. Beau. & Fl.

 

© Webster 1913.


Flirt, v. i.

1.

To run and dart about; to act with giddiness, or from a desire to attract notice; especially, to play the coquette; to play at courtship; to coquet; as, they flirt with the young men.

2.

To utter contemptious language, with an air of disdain; to jeer or gibe.

[Obs.]

Beau. & Fl.

 

© Webster 1913.


Flirt, n.

1.

A sudden jerk; a quick throw or cast; a darting motion; hence, a jeer.

Several little flirts and vibrations. Addison.

With many a flirt and flutter. E. A. Poe.

2. [Cf. LG. flirtje, G. flirtchen. See Flirt, v. t.]

One who flirts; esp., a woman who acts with giddiness, or plays at courtship; a coquette; a pert girl.

Several young flirts about town had a design to cast us out of the fashionable world. Addison.

 

© Webster 1913.


Flirt, a.

Pert; wanton.

[Obs.]

 

© Webster 1913.

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