Note: this was written by me, peidran, 1998.02.16. For more, check <http://dreadnaught.editthispage.com/poetry/>.

My tree will surely tell
it's been here many years
We know each other well
(we've shed several tears)

Wind slapped me around
they always will...
I throw them a frown,
I grumble into town.

Tumbling through the streets
to find myself an axe.
the Tree loudly creaks,
from a distance faintly hacks:

WHERE'S MY WAITRESS...

Dis*par"age (?; 48), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Disparaged (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Disparaging (?).] [OF. desparagier, F. d'eparager, to marry unequally; pref. des- (L. dis-) + F. parage extraction, lineage, from L. par equal, peer. See Peer.]

1.

To match unequally; to degrade or dishonor by an unequal marriage.

[Obs.]

Alas! that any of my nation Should ever so foul disparaged be. Chaucer.

2.

To dishonor by a comparison with what is inferior; to lower in rank or estimation by actions or words; to speak slightingly of; to depreciate; to undervalue.

Those forbidding appearances which sometimes disparage the actions of men sincerely pious. Bp. Atterbury.

Thou durst not thus disparage glorious arms. Milton.

Syn. -- To decry; depreciate; undervalue; underrate; cheapen; vilify; reproach; detract from; derogate from; degrade; debase. See Decry.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis"pa*rage` (?), n.

Inequality in marriage; marriage with an inferior.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

Dissuaded her from such a disparage. Spenser.

 

© Webster 1913.

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