Turkey Dressing


  • 1 loaf White Bread
  • 1 large chopped Onion
  • 1 cup chopped Celery
  • 1 tsp. Sage
  • 3 eggs
  • 1 quart juice of Turkey
  1. Bake bread in oven at 250 degrees until dry
  2. Cut or break bread into small pieces
  3. Mix all ingredients
  4. Bake mixture in pan at 350 degrees for 1 hour or make "pods" out of the dressing and cook at 350 degrees for 30 minutes

See Also: Turkey Gravy, Turkey
Actually, turkeys are interesting to stuff since you have a two-front war: the main cavity and the crop. Traditionally, the main cavity is filled with a starchy dressing and the crop, something richer. We'll deal with the main cavity first.

Any whole-grain starch can be used to make a passable stuffing by making skillet pilaf and adding onions, celery, and a flavoring, such as mushrooms or dried or fresh fruit. A few nuts (walnuts, pine nuts, almonds...) are good for crunch factor. For a custard-like stuffing, add 1 or 2 raw eggs and a half-cup of milk when the stuffing is cooked and before you put it in the bird. (This should be done about as soon as you can before putting it in the oven...stuffing standing around inside a turkey isn't healthy). Bread crumbs (from white, corn or any kind of bread) can be used in the same way...just cut the bread very small, and add to the oil-onion-celery mixture to fry a little before adding the other ingredients. Stuffing should be moist but not gloppy when you put it in.

Crop stuffing, is, as I said, a soup of a different broth. Some people are oyster-lovers, some are hot for sausage meat, others like chestnuts. One of the most effective is to saute the turkey's liver (along with some other livers from chicken) with some shallots and brandy, chopped fine before stuffing.

I've made at least a dozen turkeys and none have ever had quite the same dressing. Quinoa and quince anyone? MMMMMMMM.....

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.