The name of a Canadian Television show on CBC featuring The Frantics. It only ran for one season (13 episodes). The actors in the Frantics were Rick Green, Dan Redican, Paul Chato and Peter Wildman. Regular skits included Mr. Canoehead, Mr. Interesting, and Paul's tasteless video games.

A slang term for a four-speed transmission, where the gearshift is mounted on the floorboard, instead of on the column. These were very popular in the sixties and it was obvious when someone had one 'cause their right shoulder would dip down when they changed gears; so, while driving my mother's '57 Ford, I would lean down toward the floor and then bend my arm back up and shift the one on the column. Therefore, it appeared that I was one of the cool guys, like James Dean in Rebel without a Cause. Actually, the only thing I had in common with James Dean was that he was in the movies, and I watched them.

OONCE! OONCE! OONCE! OONCE! OONCE! OONCE! OONCE! OONCE!

The basic kickdrum beat of house and techno, consisting of a (usually synthetic) kickdrum on every beat of a bar of 4/4 time.

The legend goes that Giorgio Moroder was wondering how to make the funky music he loved easier to dance to for suburban white kids, when he happened to visit a wedding in Germany. There, he noticed that a large number of elderly Germans were having no trouble at all dancing to the regular bass drum rhythm of the local oompah band. Spotting that this could work for his club audiences too, he started putting the beat on his disco records. The rest was history...

(I have absolutely no evidence for this story, but it's good enough that I want to believe it.)

When applying crude racial generalisations to music, the straight, regimented, four to the floor beat is considered more 'white' than the funky, polyrhythmic breakbeat. However, it's worth bearing in mind that the canonical four to the floor genres - house and techno - were both invented by black people.

One last thing: 4/4 time and four to the floor are not the same thing - virtually all modern dance music is in 4/4, and using the two terms interchangably will cause confusion the first time you tell someone that drum and bass isn't 4/4.

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