The natural order of discussion and debate, designed to give everyone a chance to speak up, and to keep things relatively on topic.

Or, what everyone always says I haven't got when I interrupt them.

#include <math.h>

double floor(double x);


Returns the greatest integral value not greater than x. See also ceil.

Floor is a mathematical function, from ℜ to Z (the set of real numbers to the set of integers). The floor of x is the greatest integer which is not greater than x (i.e., the value of x, rounded down). Basically, start at x on the number line, and if it's not already an integer move in the negative direction until you hit an integer.

The mathematical notation for taking the floor of x is to surround it by vertical bars, like the absolute value notation, except with short horizontal stems joined to the bottom of the bars and pointing inwards (like [x] with the top stems missing). The HTML tags are &lfloor; and &rfloor; and on your browser they look like this:
x⌋.

Compare with ceiling.

Floor (?), n. [AS. flr; akin to D. vloer, G. flur field, floor, entrance hall, Icel. flr floor of a cow stall, cf. Ir. & Gael. lar floor, ground, earth, W. llawr, perh. akin to L. planus level. Cf. Plain smooth.]

1.

The bottom or lower part of any room; the part upon which we stand and upon which the movables in the room are supported.

2.

The structure formed of beams, girders, etc., with proper covering, which divides a building horizontally into stories. Floor in sense 1 is, then, the upper surface of floor in sense 2.

3.

The surface, or the platform, of a structure on which we walk or travel; as, the floor of a bridge.

4.

A story of a building. See Story.

5. Legislative Assemblies (a)

The part of the house assigned to the members.

(b)

The right to speak.

[U.S.]

⇒ Instead of he has the floor, the English say, he is in possession of the house.

6. Naut.

That part of the bottom of a vessel on each side of the keelson which is most nearly horizontal.

7. Mining (a)

The rock underlying a stratified or nearly horizontal deposit.

(b)

A horizontal, flat ore body.

Raymond.

Floor cloth, a heavy fabric, painted, varnished, or saturated, with waterproof material, for covering floors; oilcloth. -- Floor cramp, an implement for tightening the seams of floor boards before nailing them in position. -- Floor light, a frame with glass panes in a floor. -- Floor plan. (a) Shipbuilding A longitudinal section, showing a ship as divided at the water line. (b) Arch. A horizontal section, showing the thickness of the walls and partitions, arrangement of passages, apartments, and openings at the level of any floor of a house.

 

© Webster 1913.


Floor, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Floored (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Flooring.]

1.

To cover with a floor; to furnish with a floor; as, to floor a house with pine boards.

2.

To strike down or lay level with the floor; to knock down; hence, to silence by a conclusive answer or retort; as, to floor an opponent.

Floored or crushed by him. Coleridge.

3.

To finish or make an end of; as, to floor a college examination.

[Colloq.]

I've floored my little-go work. T. Hughes.

 

© Webster 1913.

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