(So named in 1843 by Carl Gustaf Mosander, Swedish chemist after Ytterby, a village in Sweden where the rare earth minerals were first found) A grayish silver trivalent chemical element, one of the rare-earth metals. It is an important constituent of signal repeaters in long-distance telephone cables.

Symbol: Er
Atomic number: 68
Atomic weight: 167.26
Density (at room temperature and pressure): 9.066 g/cc
Melting point: 1,529°C
Boiling point: 2,868°C
Valence: +3
Ground state electron configuration: [Xe]4f126s2
Erbium
Symbol: Er
Atomic Number: 68
Atomic Weight: 167.26
Boiling Point: 3140 K
Melting Point: 1802 K
Density at 300K: 9.07 g/cm3
Covalent radius: 1.57
Atomic radius: 2.45
Atomic volume: 18.4 cm3/mol
First ionization potental: 6.101 V
Specific heat capacity: 0.168 Jg-1K-1
Thermal conductivity: 14.3 Wm-1K-1
Electrical conductivity: 1.2*106Ω-1m-1
Heat of fusion: 17.15 kJ/mol
Heat of vaporization: 292.88 kJ/mol
Electronegativity: 1.24 (Pauling's)

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Er"bi*um (?), n. [NL. from Ytterby, in Sweden, where gadolinite is found. Cf. Terbium, Yttrium, Ytterbium.] (Chem.)

A rare metallic element associated with several other rare elements in the mineral gadolinite from Ytterby in Sweden. Symbol Er. Atomic weight 165.9. Its salts are rose-colored and give characteristic spectra. Its sesquioxide is called erbia.

 

© Webster 1913


Er"bi*um (?), n. [NL. Named from Ytterby, in Sweden, where gadolinite is found. Cf. Terbium, Yttrium, Ytterbium.] (Chem.)

A metallic element of the rare earth group, found in gadolinite and some other minerals. Symbol, Er; at. wt. 167.4. Its salts are rose-colored and give characteristic spectra.

 

© Webster 1913

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