Discover magazine got bought out by the Walt Disney Company in recent years but the quality of articles has not diminished.

A great way to keep an intelligent, curious kid occupied. More readable than most other science magazines (Nature is not readable by most kids), more colourful and with more pictures and diagrams than Scientific American and New Scientist (this is debatable though). A good, general purpose science magazine that has something new each and every month.

Of Discover's regular columns, vital signs discusses various interesting medical cases as told by regular contributors (all of whom are medical practitioners in some speciality or other), Light Elements seems to have disappeared since Disney took over, the bogglers/puzzles at the back of the magazine are still good and a new column at the very end of the magazine, Neuro Quest has given new insight into what we take for granted nowadays, our senses, feelings, thoughts, actions and anything vaguely neurological.


Disclaimer: As of the time of writing of this writeup, I am not (nor have ever been) an employee of Discover magazine nor do I hold (or have ever held) any shares in Disney.

Dis*cov"er (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Discovered (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Discovering.] [OE. discoveren, discuren, descuren, OF. descovrir, descouvrir, F. d'ecouvrir; des- (L. dis-) + couvrir to cover. See Cover.]

1.

To uncover.

[Obs.]

Whether any man hath pulled down or discovered any church. Abp. Grindal.

2.

To disclose; to lay open to view; to make visible; to reveal; to make known; to show (what has been secret, unseen, or unknown).

Go, draw aside the curtains, and discover The several caskets to this noble prince. Shak.

Prosperity doth best discover vice; but adversity doth best discover virtue. Bacon.

We will discover ourselves unto them. 1 Sam. xiv. 8.

Discover not a secret to another. Prov. xxv. 9.

3.

To obtain for the first time sight or knowledge of, as of a thing existing already, but not perceived or known; to find; to ascertain; to espy; to detect.

Some to discover islands far away. Shak.

4.

To manifest without design; to show.

The youth discovered a taste for sculpture. C. J. Smith.

5.

To explore; to examine.

[Obs.]

Syn. -- To disclose; bring out; exhibit; show; manifest; reveal; communicate; impart; tell; espy; find; out; detect. -- To Discover, Invent. We discover what existed before, but remained unknown; we invent by forming combinations which are either entirely new, or which attain their end by means unknown before. Columbus discovered America; Newton discovered the law of gravitation; Whitney invented the cotton gin; Galileo invented the telescope.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*cov"er, v. i.

To discover or show one's self.

[Obs.]

This done, they discover. Decke.

Nor was this the first time that they discovered to be followers of this world. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

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