Title of an interesting collection of music released by Jump, Little Children in 1998 on Atlantic Records. Listening from start to finish, each track seems strikingly different from the last. It's an amazing album, though I wonder slightly at the arrangement of tracks as flow might have been improved with slight alteration.

Track Listing:

1. Not Today
2. Violent Dreams
3. Come Out Clean
4. Cathedrals
5. All Those Days Are Gone
6. Body Parts
7. My Guitar
8. B-13
9. Habit
10. Say Goodnight
11. Close Your Eyes

so let's break it down, a little..
My favourite slow tracks on the album are most definitely "Close Your Eyes" and "Cathedrals", though most every song on the album appeals to me in some way, "Come Out Clean" is fast and fairly loud but very good. It's hard to describe the album as a whole, except to say that it jumps all over the place.. sweet enchanting vocals, lyrics, to harsh and unsettling. Most times, I can't listen all the way through, simply because it doesn't fit any one mood well enough.

I don't know that many people that are into Jump, Little Children, but the people I do know are very into them. There is a good reason for that.. check the album out, though nothing beats one of their live shows. The entire group has a lot of experience and are extremely talented. Get acquainted with this album, and the new one, "Vertigo", hit up one of their shows, and you'll know exactly why so many people are addicted.

One last note.. few things are quite so awe inspiringly gorgeous as watching them perform Cathedrals live, or as exciting as hearing the first few notes of Violent Dreams or gosh any of it. Listen and support them, they deserve it.

The name of one of the very first post-punk bands, formed by former Buzzcocks vocalist Howard Devoto with guitarist John McGeoch, bassist Barry Adamson, keyboardist Bob Dickinson, and drummer Martin Jackson. They performed their first concert in June of 1977. The band had several good albums despite frequent changes in its lineup. Magazine could rightfully be considered one of the very first indie bands despite the fact that it broke up in 1981, many years before the music journalists invented the term for Husker Du and Nirvana.

The old E1 "Magazine (the band)" node. Adjust your hard-links accordingly.

Howard Devoto's post-Buzzcocks band, taking their ethos further, into the realm of art-rock, with the addition of keyboards and songs about "My Tulpa" and such. They had their greatest success with Magic, Murder, and the Weather, and the geeky-Motown "About the Weather", but rather than cash in on what could have been a lucrative run of hits, Devoto shut the thing down. Alumni include John McGeoch and Ben Mandelson of Siouxsie and the Banshees, and composer Barry Adamson.

Mag`a*zine" (?), n. [F. magasin, It. magazzino, or Sp. magacen, almagacen; all fr. Ar. makhzan, almakhzan, a storehouse, granary, or cellar.]

1.

A receptacle in which anything is stored, especially military stores, as ammunition, arms, provisions, etc. "Armories and magazines." Milton.

2.

The building or room in which the supply of powder is kept in a fortification or a ship.

3.

A chamber in a gun for holding a number of cartridges to be fed automatically to the piece.

4.

A pamphlet published periodically containing miscellaneous papers or compositions.

Magazine dress, clothing made chiefly of woolen, without anything metallic about it, to be worn in a powder magazine. --
Magazine gun, a portable firearm, as a rifle, with a chamber carrying cartridges which are brought automatically into position for firing. --
Magazine stove, a stove having a chamber for holding fuel which is supplied to the fire by some self-feeding process, as in the common base-burner.

 

© Webster 1913


Mag`a*zine" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Magazined (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Magazining.]

To store in, or as in, a magazine; to store up for use.

 

© Webster 1913


Mag`a*zine", n.

1.

A country or district especially rich in natural products.

2.

A city viewed as a marketing center.

3.

A reservoir or supply chamber for a stove, battery, camera, typesetting machine, or other apparatus.

4.

A store, or shop, where goods are kept for sale.

 

© Webster 1913

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