There are very few places in Wales that are flat, and Criccieth in North Wales, near Porthmadog, is not one of them. Criccieth is the site of an ancient Welsh castle, but it is far from the most interesting castle in the area: only the gatehouse has walls that still reach above waist height. The castle at nearby Harlech is far more entertaining, or tourists in search of something bigger may prefer Caenarfon castle.
The small town is quite well-equipped for its size, and its guest houses are the domain of families who return year after year. I would advise visitors to avoid the two chip shops in the town, both of which have a WWII feel to them (in terms of hygiene as well as speed of service), but the three restaurants are quite appealing. I would also recommend a trip along the seafront (Criccieth is a coastal town with a small beach) to the seafront cafe. The cafe in question is what American tourists tend to describe as 'quaint'. It looks like the sort of place you see in screen adaptations of Agatha Christie novels, but once you get in past the twenties exterior, you walk into what could almost be a museum of arcade games through the ages. On the more modern side they have pool tables and a Sega Rally from 1994, but the offerings go back through an Alien 3 gun game, via a 1989 racing game, all the way to an original Space Invaders from Taito, complete with cellophane strips! Trust me, go in there and you will need a brown paper bag to stop you from hyperventilating.
There is not much more to say about Criccieth as it is not a very large town. It is reachable by train, bus, car, or boat. People wishing to sail in the waters at Criccieth have to register first at the Porthmadog harbourmaster's office, near the marina.

Criccieth is a small seaside town located on the Llyn Peninsula in Gwynedd, north Wales in the old county of Caernarfonshire. It lies between the towns of Porthmadog and Pwllheli and is known as "The Pearl Of Wales On The Shores Of Snowdonia". The name Criccieth is pronounced Crick-Yeth or Crick-Key-eth and is probably a corruption of the Welsh "Craig Câs", meaning "Heather Rock".

Criccieths existence arose in the 1230s when Llewelyn the Great built a castle there and in 1239 it is mentioned as being the prison where Llewelyn the Great placed his rebellious son Gruffydd. In 1282 it was captured by Edward I who repaired and enlarged the castle and two years afterwards declared Criccieth a free borough, although at the time it was little more than a church and a few houses.

Criccieth remained a small fishing village, especially once the importance of Criccieth Castle had disappeared, until the year 1867 when the Cambrian Coast Railway reached the village. The village became a summer resort for wealthy families, who often retired to Criccieth for the whole summer - most of today's Criccieth was therefore built by the Victorians as the village turned into a town.

Criccieth's was most famous son was the Liberal Party politician David Lloyd George who was the British Prime Minister between 1916 and 1922.

Table of References

  • http://www.gazetteer-wales.co.uk/
  • http://www.genuki.org.uk/big/wal/
  • www.criccieth.co.uk/
  • http://www.the-chapel-of-art.freeserve.co.uk/criccieth_history.html

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