Bowl (?), n. [OE. bolle, AS. bolla; akin to Icel. bolli, Dan. bolle, G. bolle, and perh. to E. boil a tumor. Cf. Boll.]

1.

A concave vessel of various forms (often approximately hemisherical), to hold liquids, etc.

Brought them food in bowls of basswood. Longfellow.

2.

Specifically, a drinking vessel for wine or other spirituous liquors; hence, convival drinking.

3.

The contents of a full bowl; what a bowl will hold.

4.

The bollow part of a thing; as, the bowl of a spoon.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bowl (?), n. [F. boule, fr. L. bulla bubble, stud. Cf. Bull an edict, Bill a writing.]

1.

A ball of wood or other material used for rolling on a level surface in play; a ball of hard wood having one side heavier than the other, so as to give it a bias when rolled.

2. pl.

An ancient game, popular in Great Britain, played with biased balls on a level plat of greensward.

Like an uninstructed bowler, . . . who thinks to attain the jack by delivering his bowl straightforward upon it. Sir W. Scott.

3. pl.

The game of tenpins or bowling.

[U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Bowl (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Bowled (#); p. pr. & vb. n. Bowling.]

1.

To roll, as a bowl or cricket ball.

Break all the spokes and fellies from her wheel, And bowl the round nave down the hill of heaven. Shak.

2.

To roll or carry smoothly on, or as on, wheels; as, we were bowled rapidly along the road.

3.

To pelt or strike with anything rolled.

Alas, I had rather be set quick i' the earth, And bowled to death with turnips Shak.

To bowl (a player) out, in cricket, to put out a striker by knocking down a bail or a stump in bowling.

 

© Webster 1913.


Bowl, v. i.

1.

To play with bowls.

2.

To roll a ball on a plane, as at cricket, bowls, etc.

3.

To move rapidly, smoothly, and like a ball; as, the carriage bowled along.

 

© Webster 1913.

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