Molecular Geometry is the geometry of a molecule as a whole. This geometry depends on the number of covalent bonds, as well as the number of lone pair electrons.

For the basic geometries (assuming no lone pairs), two bonds (sp) will result in linear geometry, three bonds(sp²) will result in a trigonal planar geometry, four bonds (sp³) will result in tetrahedral geometry, five bonds (sp³d) will result in trigonal bipyramidal geometry, and six bonds (sp³d²) will result in octrahedral geometry.

Deviations from these geometries due to lone pair electron repulsion include trigonal pyramidal (sp³, one lone pair), bent (sp³, two lone pairs), bent (sp², one lone pair), seesaw (sp³d, one lone pair), and t-shape (sp³d, two lone pairs), linear(sp³d, three lone pairs), square planar(sp³d², two lone pairs).

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