Smack (?), n. [D. smak; akin to LG. smack, smak, Dan. smakke, G. schmacke, F. semaque.] Naut.

A small sailing vessel, commonly rigged as a sloop, used chiefly in the coasting and fishing trade.

 

© Webster 1913.


Smack, n. [OE. smak, AS. ssmc taste, savor; akin to D. smaak, G. geschmack, OHG. smac; cf. Lith. smagus pleasant. Cf. Smack, v. i.]

1.

Taste or flavor, esp. a slight taste or flavor; savor; tincture; as, a smack of bitter in the medicine. Also used figuratively.

So quickly they have taken a smack in covetousness. Robynson (More's Utopia).

They felt the smack of this world. Latimer.

2.

A small quantity; a taste.

Dryden.

3.

A loud kiss; a buss.

"A clamorous smack."

Shak.

4.

A quick, sharp noise, as of the lips when suddenly separated, or of a whip.

5.

A quick, smart blow; a slap.

Johnson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Smack, adv.

As if with a smack or slap.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Smack, v. i. [imp. & p. p. Smacked (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Smacking.] [OE. smaken to taste, have a taste, -- from the noun; cf. AS. smecan taste; akin to D. smaken, G. schmecken, OHG. smechen to taste, smachn to have a taste (and, derived from the same source, G. schmatzen to smack the lips, to kiss with a sharp noise, MHG. smatzen, smackzeen), Icel smakka to taste, Sw. smaka, Dan. smage. See 2d Smack, n.]

1.

To have a smack; to be tinctured with any particular taste.

2.

To have or exhibit indications of the presence of any character or quality.

All sects, all ages, smack of this vice. Shak.

3.

To kiss with a close compression of the lips, so as to make a sound when they separate; to kiss with a sharp noise; to buss.

4.

To make a noise by the separation of the lips after tasting anything.

 

© Webster 1913.


Smack, v. t.

1.

To kiss with a sharp noise; to buss.

2.

To open, as the lips, with an inarticulate sound made by a quick compression and separation of the parts of the mouth; to make a noise with, as the lips, by separating them in the act of kissing or after tasting.

Drinking off the cup, and smacking his lips with an air of ineffable relish. Sir W. Scott.

3.

To make a sharp noise by striking; to crack; as, to smack a whip.

"She smacks the silken thong."

Young.

 

© Webster 1913.

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