The name given to a South African gas braai which is both portable and reasonably compact. The skottel usually consists of a gas canister as a base, and a narrow tube for a neck which feeds the gas to the cicular ring of flame, on which rests the cooking surface.

The most popular brand of gas canister is made by a company called Cadac, which has also led to these braais being referred to as 'Cadacs'. At the Wanderers cricket stadium, this company have sponsored a section of the ground and provided a number of skottels for the hungry sports fans. These gas canisters are operated through turning a key to turn on the gas; these keys are widely despised, due to their all too common habit of disappearing whenever you need them.

Once the gas is on, the braai is lit by applying flame to the ring, and resting the surface on top. The most widely used and versatile surface used is a type of slightly flattened wok, confusingly also referred to as a skottel. It has a slightly (and short-lived) non-stick surface, allowing for the frying of eggs and bacon, and a concave centre, in which beans, tomatoes or sauce can be cooked.

The whole structure can be dismantled and carried around, although the canister is pretty heavy. Thanks to the ease of use, the easy cleaning, and low cost, the skottel has turned into a South African institution.

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