Sev"er*al (?), a. [OF., fr. LL. separalis, fr. L. separ separate, different. See Sever, Separate.]

1.

Separate; distinct; particular; single.

Each several ship a victory did gain. Dryden.

Each might his several province well command, Would all but stoop to what they understand. Pope.

2.

Diverse; different; various.

Spenser.

Habits and faculties, several, and to be distinguished. Bacon.

Four several armies to the field are led. Dryden.

3.

Consisting of a number more than two, but not very many; divers; sundry; as, several persons were present when the event took place.

 

© Webster 1913.


Sev"er*al, adv.

By itself; severally.

[Obs.]

Every kind of thing is laid up several in barns or storehoudses. Robynson (More's Utopia).

 

© Webster 1913.


Sev"er*al, n.

1.

Each particular taken singly; an item; a detail; an individual.

[Obs.]

There was not time enough to hear . . . The severals. Shak.

2.

Persons oe objects, more than two, but not very many.

Several of them neither rose from any conspicuous family, nor left any behind them. Addison.

3.

An inclosed or separate place; inclosure.

[Obs.]

They had their several for heathen nations, their several for the people of their own nation. Hooker.

In several, in a state of separation. [R.] "Where pastures in several be."

Tusser.

 

© Webster 1913.

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