In programming, to insert spaces in front of lines of code that form the body of a loop, if statement, function, or other program structure. Nested structures should be indented further. This is generally considered good programming practice but not absolutely necessary.

In some languages, indentation has special meaning. For instance, in Fortran, the first 6 characters of each line have special meaning and normal program code is indented 6 characters. In Python, indentation is used to define the beginnings and endings of program structures, as described above, but it therefore becomes necessary.

In*dent" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Indented; p. pr. & vb. n. Indenting.] [OE. endenten to notch, fit in, OF. endenter, LL. indentare, fr. L. in + dens, dentis, tooth. See Tooth, and cf. Indenture.]

1.

To notch; to jag; to cut into points like a row of teeth; as, to indent the edge of paper.

2.

To dent; to stamp or to press in; to impress; as, indent a smooth surface with a hammer; to indent wax with a stamp.

3. [Cf. Indenture.]

To bind out by indenture or contract; to indenture; to apprentice; as, to indent a young man to a shoemaker; to indent a servant.

4. Print.

To begin (a line or lines) at a greater or less distance from the margin; as, to indent the first line of a paragraph one em; to indent the second paragraph two ems more than the first. See Indentation, and Indention.

5. Mil.

To make an order upon; to draw upon, as for military stores.

[India]

Wilhelm.

 

© Webster 1913.


In*dent", v. i.

1.

To be cut, notched, or dented.

2.

To crook or turn; to wind in and out; to zigzag.

3.

To contract; to bargain or covenant.

Shak.

To indent and drive bargains with the Almighty. South.

 

© Webster 1913.


In*dent" (?), n.

1.

A cut or notch in the man gin of anything, or a recess like a notch.

Shak.

2.

A stamp; an impression.

[Obs.]

3.

A certificate, or intended certificate, issued by the government of the United States at the close of the Revolution, for the principal or interest of the public debt.

D. Ramsay. A. Hamilton.

4. Mil.

A requisition or order for supplies, sent to the commissariat of an army.

[India]

Wilhelm.

 

© Webster 1913.

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