handwave = H = Hanlon's Razor

hang v.

1. [very common] To wait for an event that will never occur. "The system is hanging because it can't read from the crashed drive". See wedged, hung. 2. To wait for some event to occur; to hang around until something happens. "The program displays a menu and then hangs until you type a character." Compare block. 3. To attach a peripheral device, esp. in the construction `hang off': "We're going to hang another tape drive off the file server." Implies a device attached with cables, rather than something that is strictly inside the machine's chassis.

--The Jargon File version 4.3.1, ed. ESR, autonoded by rescdsk.

hang and its derivative words have various uses in chess parlance.

To "hang" a piece is to allow it to be captured "for free" (i.e., without the possibility of an equalising recapture on the next move). The word "hang" is usually employed when such a situation occurs because of a silly error; deliberately allowing a piece to be captured would instead be termed a "sacrifice". Example usage: "Fischer overlooked a simple tactic in the early middlegame and hung his bishop".

An insufficiently protected man, one liable to be hung, is said to be "hanging". This may be because the piece is completely unprotected (in this case it would be described as "hanging" even if no enemy men are currently attacking it), or protected by fewer pieces than the number attacking it, or if it is protected only by a pinned piece. Example usage: "The knight on c4 is hanging, so White needs to prevent the black queen from coming to b4 with check, winning a piece".

Another usage appears in the term "hanging pawns", which describes a pair of like-coloured pawns on adjacent files flanked on both sides by files containing no friendly pawns. For example, if White has pawns on c4 and d4 but no pawns on the b- or e-files, then the c- and d-pawns would be described as "hanging".

Hang (hang), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Hanged (hangd) or Hung (hung); p. pr. & vb. n. Hanging. The use of hanged is preferable to that of hung, when reference is had to death or execution by suspension, and it is also more common.] [OE. hangen, hongien, v. t. & i., AS. hangian, v. i., fr. hOn, v. t. (imp. heng, p. p. hongen); akin to OS. hangOn, v. i., D. hangen, v. t. & i., G. hangen, v. i., hängen, v. t., Icel. hanga, v. i., Goth. hAhan, v. t. (imp. haíhah), hAhan, v. i. (imp. hahaida), and perh. to L. cunctari to delay. √37. ]

1.

To suspend; to fasten to some elevated point without support from below; -- often used with up or out; as, to hang a coat on a hook; to hang up a sign; to hang out a banner.

2.

To fasten in a manner which will allow of free motion upon the point or points of suspension; -- said of a pendulum, a swing, a door, gate, etc.

3.

To fit properly, as at a proper angle (a part of an implement that is swung in using), as a scythe to its snath, or an ax to its helve. [U. S.]

4.

To put to death by suspending by the neck; -- a form of capital punishment; as, to hang a murderer.

5.

To cover, decorate, or furnish by hanging pictures, trophies, drapery, and the like, or by covering with paper hangings; -- said of a wall, a room, etc.

Hung be the heavens with black.
Shak.

And hung thy holy roofs with savage spoils.
Dryden.

6.

To paste, as paper hangings, on the walls of a room.

7.

To hold or bear in a suspended or inclined manner or position instead of erect; to droop; as, he hung his head in shame.

Cowslips wan that hang the pensive head.
Milton.

To hang down, to let fall below the proper position; to bend down; to decline; as, to hang down the head, or, elliptically, to hang the head. --
To hang fire (Mil.), to be slow in communicating fire through the vent to the charge; as, the gun hangs fire; hence, to hesitate, to hold back as if in suspense.

 

© Webster 1913


Hang, v. i.

1.

To be suspended or fastened to some elevated point without support from below; to dangle; to float; to rest; to remain; to stay.

2.

To be fastened in such a manner as to allow of free motion on the point or points of suspension.

3.

To die or be put to death by suspension from the neck. [R.] "Sir Balaam hangs." Pope.

4.

To hold for support; to depend; to cling; -- usually with on or upon; as, this question hangs on a single point. "Two infants hanging on her neck." Peacham.

5.

To be, or be like, a suspended weight.

Life hangs upon me, and becomes a burden.
Addison.

6.

To hover; to impend; to appear threateningly; -- usually with over; as, evils hang over the country.

7.

To lean or incline; to incline downward.

To decide which way hung the victory.
Milton.

His neck obliquely o'er his shoulder hung.
Pope.

8.

To slope down; as, hanging grounds.

9.

To be undetermined or uncertain; to be in suspense; to linger; to be delayed.

A noble stroke he lifted high,
Which hung not, but so swift with tempest fell
On the proud crest of Satan.
Milton.

To hang around, to loiter idly about. - - To hang back, to hesitate; to falter; to be reluctant. "If any one among you hangs back." Jowett (Thucyd.). --
To hang by the eyelids.
(a) To hang by a very slight hold or tenure.
(b) To be in an unfinished condition; to be left incomplete. --
To hang in doubt, to be in suspense. --
To hang on (with the emphasis on the preposition), to keep hold; to hold fast; to stick; to be persistent, as a disease. --
To hang on the lips, words, etc., to be charmed by eloquence. --
To hang out.
(a) To be hung out so as to be displayed; to project.
(b) To be unyielding; as, the juryman hangs out against an agreement. [Colloq.] --
To hang over.
(a) To project at the top.
(b) To impend over. --
To hang to, to cling. --
To hang together.
(a) To remain united; to stand by one another. "We are all of a piece; we hang together." Dryden.

(b) To be self- consistent; as, the story does not hang together. [Colloq.] --
To hang upon.
(a) To regard with passionate affection.
(b) (Mil.) To hover around; as, to hang upon the flanks of a retreating enemy.

 

© Webster 1913


Hang, n.

1.

The manner in which one part or thing hangs upon, or is connected with, another; as, the hang of a scythe.

2.

Connection; arrangement; plan; as, the hang of a discourse. [Colloq.]

3.

A sharp or steep declivity or slope. [Colloq.]

To get the hang of, to learn the method or arrangement of; hence, to become accustomed to. [Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913


Hang, v. i. (Cricket, Tennis, etc.)

Of a ball: To rebound unexpectedly or unusually slowly, due to backward spin on the ball or imperfections of ground.

 

© Webster 1913


Hang (?), v. t.

To prevent from reaching a decision, esp. by refusing to join in a verdict that must be unanimous; as, one obstinate juror can hang a jury.

 

© Webster 1913

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.