Ebb (?), n. Zool.

The European bunting.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ebb, n. [AS. ebba; akin to Fries. ebba, D. eb, ebbe, Dan. & G. ebbe, Sw. ebb, cf. Goth. ibuks backward; prob. akin to E. even.]

1.

The reflux or flowing back of the tide; the return of the tidal wave toward the sea; -- opposed to flood; as, the boats will go out on the ebb.

Thou shoreless flood which in thy ebb and flow Claspest the limits of morality! Shelley.

2.

The state or time of passing away; a falling from a better to a worse state; low state or condition; decline; decay.

"Our ebb of life."

Roscommon.

Painting was then at its lowest ebb. Dryden.

Ebb and flow, the alternate ebb and flood of the tide; often used figuratively.

This alternation between unhealthy activity and depression, this ebb and flow of the industrial. A. T. Hadley.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ebb (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Ebbed (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Ebbing.] [AS. ebbian; akin to D. & G. ebben, Dan. ebbe. See 2d Ebb.]

1.

To flow back; to return, as the water of a tide toward the ocean; -- opposed to flow.

That Power who bids the ocean ebb and flow. Pope.

2.

To return or fall back from a better to a worse state; to decline; to decay; to recede.

The hours of life ebb fast. Blackmore.

Syn. -- To recede; retire; withdraw; decay; decrease; wane; sink; lower.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ebb, v. t.

To cause to flow back.

[Obs.]

Ford.

 

© Webster 1913.


Ebb, a.

Receding; going out; falling; shallow; low.

The water there is otherwise very low and ebb. Holland.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.