Distrust

Your foreign laugh
Is loaded with barefoot innocence, I...
I must remember
You are all pretense.


Poetry in Motion at Poetry.com - a project.
<< prev vext >>

Dis*trust" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Distrusted; p. pr. & vb. n. Distrusting.] [Cf. Mistrust.]

To feel absence of trust in; not to confide in or rely upon; to deem of questionable sufficiency or reality; to doubt; to be suspicious of; to mistrust.

Not distrusting my health. 2 Mac. ix. 22.

To distrust the justice of your cause. Dryden.

He that requireth the oath doth distrust that other. Udall.

Of all afraid, Distrusting all, a wise, suspicious maid. Collins.

Mistrust has been almost wholly driven out by distrust.

T. L. K. Oliphant.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dis*trust", n.

1.

Doubt of sufficiency, reality, or sincerity; want of confidence, faith, or reliance; as, distrust of one's power, authority, will, purposes, schemes, etc.

2.

Suspicion of evil designs.

Alienation and distrust . . . are the growth of false principles. D. Webster.

3.

State of being suspected; loss of trust.

Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.