Must is also the nasty mixture of grape juice, skins, and seeds which is used to ferment wine. This substance is squeezed to release the juice. In red wine. the solid part of the must is left in the wine when fermenting (and removed later). This gives it its color and its more tannic taste. White wines are fermented with only the light juice.

Must (must), v. i. or auxiliary. [OE. moste, a pret. generally meaning, could, was free to, pres. mot, moot, AS. mOste, pret. mOt, pres.; akin to D. moetan to be obliged, OS. mOtan to be free, to be obliged, OHG. muozan, G. müssen to be obliged, Sw. måste must, Goth. gamOtan to have place, have room, to able; of unknown origin.]

1.

To be obliged; to be necessitated; - - expressing either physical or moral necessity; as, a man must eat for nourishment; we must submit to the laws.

2.

To be morally required; to be necessary or essential to a certain quality, character, end, or result; as, he must reconsider the matter; he must have been insane.

Likewise must the deacons be grave.
1 Tim. iii. 8.

Morover, he [a bishop] must have a good report of them which are without.
1 Tim. iii. 7.

⇒ The principal verb, if easily supplied by the mind, was formerly often omitted when must was used; as, I must away. "I must to Coventry." Shak.

 

© Webster 1913


Must, n. [AS. must, fr. L. mustum (sc. vinum), from mustus young, new, fresh. Cf. Mustard.]

1.

The expressed juice of the grape, or other fruit, before fermentation. "These men ben full of must." Wyclif (Acts ii. 13. ).

No fermenting must fills . . . the deep vats.
Longfellow.

2. [Cf. Musty.]

Mustiness.

 

© Webster 1913


Must, v. t. & i.

To make musty; to become musty.

 

© Webster 1913


Must (must), n. [Hind. mast intoxicated, ruttish, fr. Skr. matta, p.p. of mad to rejoice, intoxicate.] (Zoöl.)

Being in a condition of dangerous frenzy, usually connected with sexual excitement; -- said of adult male elephants which become so at irregular intervals. -- n.

(a)

The condition of frenzy.

(b)

An elephant in must.

 

© Webster 1913

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