On nights like this, nothing fits. There's a disconnect between us. Background noise is altering the translation of our words across the wires.

It's like there's something else. Another force at play. A part of you that doesn't want to hear my words, a part that doesn't want me near.

I feel the tension in your voice, while it grows between our words. But tonight was the last time I will let it grow unmentioned. We can not continue driving in these old and rutted circles. You are my best friend. You are the only one with whom I have connected.

Did some word or action remind you of our past? Or were the pains I asked about, not ready to come out? Or maybe there's some part of you that doesn't want me there. Let's reconnect, let's talk again, let's see what we can see. If you poke at me when I pull back; I'll poke when you do too.


An old node found lying in a folder... come little node, let me give you life.
Curious the units of measurement in the kitchen,
The organ player from Notre Dame,
The advertisement with the monkey.

All art an expression of the inexpressible; tempered by fragile neurons.

Elissa had a seizure – did I tell you that?

Leisl, Friedrich, Gretl

The animals are breaking out of the zoo;
So anyway,

The pitch and the frequency are dirty water.
The shopping cart at the bottom of the Charles,
From that display at the Aquarium,
Came up again.
This winter
On the frozen river –
A shopping cart sat –
On the Charles!

Would you look at that?
People are such litterbugs here.

And I can see through the ice

The missiles will cross the earth?
Look, here’s the trajectory –
From California to North Korea
You can see it in the glass.

Bottoms up.

Dis`con*nect" (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Disconnected; p. pr. & vb. n. Disconnecting.]

To dissolve the union or connection of; to disunite; to sever; to separate; to disperse.

The commonwealth itself would . . . be disconnected into the dust and powder of individuality. Burke.

This restriction disconnects bank paper and the precious metals. Walsh.

 

© Webster 1913.

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