The expulsion of gases from the mouth and/or nose which have built up in the stomach.

Belching through one's nose can be painful, especially since belches tend to stink a great deal, just as vomit does.

In Western cultures, belching in public tends to be considered somewhat uncouth, but in some cultures it is considered polite to belch after a meal, to indicate that one liked the food.

Belch (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Belched (#); p. pr. & vb. n. Belching.] [OE. belken, AS. bealcan, akin to E. bellow. See Bellow, v. i.]

1.

To eject or throw up from the stomach with violence; to eruct.

I belched a hurricane of wind. Swift.

2.

To eject violently from within; to cast forth; to emit; to give vent to; to vent.

Within the gates that now Stood open wide, belching outrageous flame. Milton.

 

© Webster 1913.


Belch, v. i.

1.

To eject wind from the stomach through the mouth; to eructate.

2.

To issue with spasmodic force or noise.

Dryden.

 

© Webster 1913.


Belch, n.

1.

The act of belching; also, that which is belched; an eructation.

2.

Malt liquor; -- vulgarly so called as causing eructation.

[Obs.]

Dennis.

 

© Webster 1913.

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