Ban"ter (?), v. t. [ imp. & p. p. Bantered(); p. pr. & vb. n. Bantering.] [Prob. corrupted fr. F. badiner to joke, or perh. fr. E. bandy to beat to and fro. See Badinage, and cf. Barter fr. OF. barater.]

1.

To address playful good-natured ridicule to, -- the person addressed, or something pertaining to him, being the subject of the jesting; to rally; as, he bantered me about my credulity.

Hag-ridden by my own fancy all night, and then bantered on my haggard looks the next day. W. Irving.

2.

To jest about; to ridicule in speaking of, as some trait, habit, characteristic, and the like.

[Archaic]

If they banter your regularity, order, and love of study, banter in return their neglect of them. Chatham.

3.

To delude or trick, -- esp. by way of jest.

[Obs.]

We diverted ourselves with bantering several poor scholars with hopes of being at least his lordship's chaplain. De Foe.

4.

To challenge or defy to a match.

[Colloq. Southern and Western U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Ban"ter, n.

The act of bantering; joking or jesting; humorous or good-humored raillery; pleasantry.

Part banter, part affection. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.

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