Baby got Back, released in 1992 on Sir Mix-a-Lot's album Mack Daddy, is a song which celebrates the size and shape of the backside of the black female.

Oh, my, god. Becky, look at her butt.
It is so big. She looks like,
one of those rap guys' girlfriends.
But, y'know, who understands those rap guys?
They only talk to her, because,
she looks like a total prostitute, 'kay?
I mean, her butt, is just so big.
I can't believe it's just so round, it's like,
out there, I mean - gross. Look!
She's just so ... black!

— Introduction to Baby got Back

The song opens with a monotonous yet insistent synth-bass line, and the above introduction, read in a deliberate white/valley girl voice, and is followed immediately by Mix-a-Lot's bold style and a number of bright orchestra hit samples. His Sirness delivers verse after verse on the merits of the stereotypical black female ass while at the same time decrying the form of the slender woman:

Yeah, baby ... when it comes to females, Cosmo ain't got nothin' to do with my selection. 36-24-36? Ha ha, only if she's five-three.

The song is of course accompanied by a video featuring numerous women of African descent, shaking their asses at the camera enthusiastically as Mix-a-Lot gestures and points at them repeatedly, all the while rapping about their booties.

This song became something of a cult classic when it was released, but relegated Mix-a-Lot firmly to the "one hit wonder" category. Certainly, the phrase "oh my God, Becky, look at her butt" became an oft-repeated meme in popular culture, and today the song may be most commonly encountered as a staple of karaoke night for those who doubt their ability to actually sing. The song itself has been released on over 20 compilations, including several soundtracks.

mkb informs me that the backing beats on this track were lifted from the song Technicolor by "Channel One" - a psuedonym for Juan Atkins, one of the most important individuals in the dawn of Techno in the early 1980s.

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