wrinkle

A wrinkle-bellied whore ; one who has had a number of bastards : child-bearing leaves wrinkles in a woman's belly.

To take the wrinkles out of any one's belly ; to fill it out by a hearty meal.

You have one wrinkle more in your arse ; i.e. you have one piece of knowledge more than you had, every fresh piece of knowledge being supposed by the vulgar naturalists to add a wrinkle to that part.

The 1811 Dictionary of the Vulgar Tongue.

Wrin"kle (?), n.

A winkle.

[Local, U.S.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Wrin"kle, n. [OE. wrinkil, AS. wrincle; akin to OD. wrinckel, and prob. to Dan. rynke, Sw. rynka, Icel. hrukka, OHG. runza, G. runzel, L. ruga. .]

1.

A small ridge, prominence, or furrow formed by the shrinking or contraction of any smooth substance; a corrugation; a crease; a slight fold; as, wrinkle in the skin; a wrinkle in cloth.

"The wrinkles in my brows."

Shak.

Within I do not find wrinkles and used heart, but unspent youth. Emerson.

2.

hence, any roughness; unevenness.

Not the least wrinkle to deform the sky. Dryden.

3. [Perhaps a different word, and a dim. AS. wrenc a twisting, deceit. Cf. Wrench, n.]

A notion or fancy; a whim; as, to have a new wrinkle.

[Colloq.]

 

© Webster 1913.


Wrin"kle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. Wrinkled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Wrinkling (?).]

1.

To contract into furrows and prominences; to make a wrinkle or wrinkles in; to corrugate; as, wrinkle the skin or the brow.

"Sport that wrinkled Care derides."

Milton.

Her wrinkled form in black and white arrayed. Pope.

2.

Hence, to make rough or uneven in any way.

A keen north wind that, blowing dry, Wrinkled the face of deluge, as decayed. Milton.

Then danced we on the wrinkled sand. Bryant.

To wrinkle at, to sneer at. [Obs.]

Marston.

 

© Webster 1913.


Wrin"kle, v. i.

To shrink into furrows and ridges.

 

© Webster 1913.

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