Were is short-hand (commonly heard in related newsgroups) for a werewolf.

Locandez said that 'were' is "like a 'was' but with a longer muzzle and red-tipped paws".

Were, from the prefix form, "were-" - which, in turn, is generalised from "werewolf", "werebear", etc - indicates a class of creature that can shape-shift.

The shifting may or may not be at the creature's volition. In the case of many lycanthropes, the transformation from human to wolf form is controlled by the phase of moon. Generally, one of the two forms is human and the other some animal.

Were (?), v. t. & i.

To wear. See 3d Wear.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Were, n.

A weir. See Weir.

[Obs.]

Chaucer. Sir P. Sidney.

 

© Webster 1913.


Were, v. t. [AS. werian.]

To guard; to protect.

[Obs.]

Chaucer.

 

© Webster 1913.


Were (?). [AS. wre (thou) wast, wron (we, you, they) were, wre imp. subj. See Was.]

The imperfect indicative plural, and imperfect subjunctive singular and plural, of the verb be. See Be.

 

© Webster 1913.


Were (?), n. [AS. wer; akin to OS. & OHG. wer, Goth. wa�xa1;r, L. vir, Skr. vira. Cf. Weregild, and Werewolf.]

1.

A man.

[Obs.]

2.

A fine for slaying a man; the money value set upon a man's life; weregild.

[Obs.]

Every man was valued at a certain sum, which was called his were. Bosworth.

 

© Webster 1913.

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