"Grisen og levemåten hans" is a Norwegian fairy tale from Asbjørnsen and Moe's Norwegian Folk Tales, collected in the early 1840s. The original, Norwegian text was found at Project Runeberg and translated by me for E2. Enjoy!

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There was once a pig who was bored of his way of life, so he decided to go to court and have it changed - he thought he'd try his luck like everyone else, whether it made him thick or thin.

"What is your complaint?" asked the magistrate.

"Oh, I'm so tired of the way I live, father," said the pig. "The horse gets oats, the cow gets wheat, and they both lie in dry pens. Whereas I get but swill and dirty water; in the daytime I walk around in mud, and at night I lie in dirt and wet straw. Is this fair and just, your magistrate?" he asked.

No, the magistrate thought the pig was right, and he had a good look in his books, and passed judgement for a different way of life: "It is not fair that you should suffer more," he said; "from now on you will have wheat and peas, and sleep on a silken bed."

The pig thanked him, and was so happy that he didn't know night from day. And the whole way home he was humming and oinking to himself: "Wheat and peas, and sleep on a silken bed! Wheat and peas, and sleep on a silken bed! Wheat and peas, and sleep on a silken bed!"

The road went through a small spinney, and the fox lay in hiding, listening. And you know, he was immediately out with his pranks. He started singing with a fine voice: "Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish!"

The pig didn't care; he continued his own: "Wheat and peas, and sleep on a silken bed!" But it continued; "Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish! Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish! Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish!" And eventually, it sank in on the pig, and before he knew it, he started listening and repeating.

When he came home, they asked what had happened in court; "were you awarded a better way of life?" they asked.

"Oh, yes!" said the pig; "Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish! Swills and trash, and lie on rubbish!"

Please tell me more fairy tales!

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