So the thing that I find interesting in the face of harassment policies that go on for pages and pages and need to be signed in triplicate and waive an possible liabilty on the part of the company (but realize that you, as managers, can be held personally liable if you don't follow through on a complaint you overhear in the breakroom when you are walking past) is that so many companies can't state outright "No Dating in the Workplace". There's too many relationships usually going on already, too much corporate reshuffling that would need to be done to ensure that the head of HR doesn't ever have to supervise the head of Employee Relations because someone else might misconstrue their marriage and be offended by it. So despite the forms in triplicate, and the meetings, and the company video, we're just going to suggest that if you have to date someone you work with, make sure they're from a different department or location. Makes perfect sense to me.

If you're reading this and you're considering dating somebody you work with, it's not too late - don't do it. You spend more time with your work colleagues than you do with your loved ones usually so sometimes it can be hard not to muddle the two categories. It's easy to be more-than-friends when you spend a lot of time with somebody, but fight the urge and you'll have a happier life. If you don't already know what I'm talking about, read on...

Don't Mess With Your Livelihood
First of all, if something goes wrong, will it affect your job? You don't want to be penniless/homeless/on the dole do you? Huh? What could go wrong? Read on...

Don't Date Your Boss
You've worked hard right? People respect you for the job you do. Don't, and I repeat DON'T date your boss. You can kiss any respect you had goodbye if you do. There will be always be rumours about how you're just doing it for a pay rise/power/whatever. It may occupy your mind 24/7 and seem like the greatest thrill ever, but deal with it - it's like a rollercoaster, it's great in the beginning but after a while you'll start to feel sick.

Sick Days, a.k.a. A Sneaky Holiday
Consider this; you get flu. You feel terrible. You're bedridden. You've also infected your partner from work. They'll need to take the day off too. Do you actually think everyone at work thinks you're ill? You've obviously decided to have a day off together. When both of you do it, it's soooo much more obvious than it would normally be.

Arguments In Work
Inevitably you'll either bring an argument to work, or have an argument in work. Not nice for you, not nice for your partner, and not nice for your colleagues. Ever heard of the word, "professionalism"? No? Look it up.

Moving Jobs
If one of you decides to change jobs, imagine what life will be like for the other half once they've gone. Not only have you kept a secret from the company about your partner leaving, but now you've got people slagging off your partner for leaving. As the person left behind, you can guarantee you'll be bearing the brunt of the anger/frustration/jealousy.

Breaking Up
It will happen. Only around 3% of people who meet a partner in work actually make it last. Get ready for the tension, the dirty looks, the rumours, the sniggering, them meeting someone before you do (*ouch*), and doing it in front of everybody you work with in the pub (*cringe*). Eventually, you'll feel smaller than you've ever felt before. And you'll wonder why you read my write-up and discarded my warning.

Happily Ever After
You broke up. Finished. You've forgotten about the whole thing. It's plain sailing from here on...or is it? Depending on the break-up, the work environment will unlikely be the same again. Especially if it's somebody you worked with on a daily basis - you've both changed - it's awkward. It's tough when they meet other people too - you'll always be hearing about them (and thinking about them - grr), and that's the last thing you want happening.

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