UK: slang word for benefits from the government, aka welfare. See also jobseekers allowance.

From www.dole.com:

Founded in Hawaii in 1851, Dole Food Company, Inc. is the largest producer and marketer of fresh fruit and vegetables in the world, and markets a growing line of packaged food, and fresh flowers. The Company does business in more than 90 countries and employs approximately 60,000 full-time people.


Note that while this is a cut and paste writeup, it is the kind of information that would be commonly pasted into any news report on Dole, and not really a copyright problem.

If an editor disagree's please /msg me and I will change it.

Dole (?), n. [OE. deol, doel, dol, OF. doel, fr. doloir to suffer, fr. L. dolere; perh. akin to dolare to hew.]

grief; sorrow; lamentation.

[Archaic]

And she died. So that day there was dole in Astolat. Tennyson.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dole, n. [L. dolus: cf. F. dol.] ScotsLaw

See Dolus.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dole, n. [AS. dal portion; same word as dl. See Deal.]

1.

Distribution; dealing; apportionment.

At her general dole, Each receives his ancient soul. Cleveland.

2.

That which is dealt out; a part, share, or portion also, a scanty share or allowance.

3.

Alms; charitable gratuity or portion.

So sure the dole, so ready at their call, They stood prepared to see the manna fall. Dryden.

Heaven has in store a precious dole. Keble.

4.

A boundary; a landmark.

Halliwell.

5.

A void space left in tillage.

[Prov. Eng.]

Dole beer, beer bestowed as alms. [Obs.] -- Dole bread, bread bestowed as alms. [Obs.] -- Dole meadow, a meadow in which several persons have a common right or share.

 

© Webster 1913.


Dole (?), v. t. [imp. & p. p. Doled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Doling.]

To deal out in small portions; to distribute, as a dole; to deal out scantily or grudgingly.

The supercilious condescension with which even his reputed friends doled out their praises to him. De Quincey.

 

© Webster 1913.

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