Someone told me the following story.

It was the final examination for an introductory English course at the local university. The examination was two hours long, and exam booklets were provided to a students crowd. The professor was very strict and told the class that any exam that was not on his desk in exactly two hours would not be accepted and the student would fail.

A half hour into the exam, a student came rushing in and asked the professor for an exam booklet.

"You're not going to have time to finish this," the professor stated sarcastically as he handed the student a booklet.

"Yes I will," replied the student.

He then took a seat and began writing. After two hours, the professor called for the exams, and the students filed up and handed them in. All except the late student, who continued writing. A half hour later, the last student came up to the professor who was sitting at his desk preparing for his next class. He attempted to put his exam on the stack of exam booklets already there.

"No you don't, I'm not going to accept that. It's late." The student looked incredulous and angry.

"Do you know who I am?"

"No, as a matter of fact I don't," replied the professor.

"Do you know who I am?" the student asked again.

"No, and I don't care." replied the professor with an air of superiority.

"Good," replied the student, who quickly lifted the stack of completed exams, stuffed his in the middle, and walked out of the room.

Reb"el (?), a. [F. rebelle, fr. L. rebellis. See Rebel, v. t.]

Pertaining to rebels or rebellion; acting in revolt; rebellious; as, rebel troops.

Whoso be rebel to my judgment. Chaucer.

Convict by flight, and rebel to all law. Milton.


© Webster 1913.

Reb"el, n. [F. rebelle.]

One who rebels.

Syn. -- Revolter; insurgent. -- Rebel, Insurgent. Insurgent marks an early, and rebel a more advanced, stage of opposition to government. The former rises up against his rulers, the latter makes war upon them.


© Webster 1913.

Re*bel" (?), v. i. [imp. & p. p. Rebelled (?); p. pr. & vb. n. Rebelling.] [F. rebeller, fr. L. rebellare to make war again; pref. re- again + bellare to make war, fr. bellum war. See Bellicose, and cf. Revel to carouse.]


To renounce, and resist by force, the authority of the ruler or government to which one owes obedience. See Rebellion.

The murmur and the churl's rebelling. Chaucer.

Ye have builded you an altar, that ye might rebel this day against the Lord. Josh. xxii. 16.


To be disobedient to authority; to assume a hostile or insubordinate attitude; to revolt.

Hoe could my hand rebel against my heart? How could you heart rebel against your reason? Dryden.


© Webster 1913.

Log in or registerto write something here or to contact authors.